Holiday memories from our villa in Costa Brava

“I could lie here and look at those mountains for hours” said Guy, as he sank into the easy chair in the corner of our bedroom. From Mas Gorral, our villa in Costa Brava, we could look over the countryside to the Pyrenees, the rising sun lighting up the teracotta rooftiles and the mellow stone of the farmhouses in the distance. The small town of Pontos lay below us, with birds chirping and a view of the pine forest where we never did manage to go for a walk. These are the memories that you bring back from a holiday and turn over in your mind when it’s raining in Bristol!

Our villa in Costa Brava Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

We were staying at Mas Gorral through Charming Villas Catalonia, a company that specialises in luxury villas that are full of character, in the Costa Brava region of Catalunya. Richard and Sara who run the company are based nearby in Besalu and give the villas a personal touch, helping you choose the villa that suits your needs and are on hand to sort out any issues that arise.

At our villa Mas Gorral through Charming Villas Catalonia Heatheronhertravels.com

At our villa Mas Gorral through Charming Villas Catalonia

I hope you enjoy the video below about Mas Gorral with Charming Villas Catalonia

If you can’t see the video above about our villa in Catalonia see it on my blog here or Youtube here and please do subscribe using the button above

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Rustic Chic in our Costa Brava Villa

Our five bedroom villa, Mas Gorral was an old rambling farmhouse that easily accommodated our party of nine, made up of our family as well as Guy’s sister and family. I enjoyed imagining the history of this place, how rooms had been added to over the years, to suit the needs and ambitions of various owners. With everything built of local stone, bound together by ochre mortar, teracotta roof tiles and green creepers clothing the walls, it was difficult to tell what was original and what was modern.

At our villa Mas Gorral through Charming Villas Catalonia Heatheronhertravels.com

Bedroom at our villa Mas Gorral through Charming Villas Catalonia

Inside the theme was rustic chic, with mottled plaster walls left natural in places, in others painted creams and yellows. Exposed beams held up the ceiling with stone sinks in the kitchen and three bathrooms. Every room was huge, with imposing antique armoires and chests of drawers to match the scale of the house.

At our villa Mas Gorral through Charming Villas Catalonia Heatheronhertravels.com

At our villa Mas Gorral through Charming Villas Catalonia

Quirky artwork and furnishings

From the eclectic furnishings I imagined that the owners had travelled far and wide; a black Chinese laquer cupboard, a carved Asian wooden chest and a large leather topped desk that wouldn’t be out of place in an English gentleman’s library. The quirky feel continued in the bold, colourful artworks – verging on the surreal, and inspired perhaps by Salvador Dali who was born just down the road in Figueres.

Painting in Mas Gorral with Charming Villas

Painting in Mas Gorral with Charming Villas

On the landing a larger-than-life lady in an aviator’s helmet, surrounded by startled cherubs; is she kissing one of them or trying eat it? The long legs of a woman diving into a hat were propped near the kitchen and in the dining room we are greeted by the back of a reclining woman with ripples of creamy flesh.

At our villa Mas Gorral through Charming Villas Catalonia Heatheronhertravels.com

Sitting room at our villa Mas Gorral through Charming Villas Catalonia

A bracing swim in the pool

On the green lawn below the house, our swimming pool overlooked the valley and the forest. Being from England we are determined to make the most of every ray of sunshine and the girls were dressed as if for the hottest of August days in skimpy tops, loose flowing skirts and strappy sandals. They lay on the sunloungers ignoring the tramontana wind but after a while were forced to retreat to a more sheltered spot on the upper terrace.

At our villa Mas Gorral through Charming Villas Catalonia Heatheronhertravels.com

Swimming pool at our villa Mas Gorral through Charming Villas Catalonia

We gathered around the pool daring each other to go in. A toe dipped in the water told us it was not going to be warm, it was April after all!  My son took a plunge and dive bombed in, splashing everyone else. Then the girls followed, surfacing from the cold water, eyes wide with the shock. A brisk couple of lengths and they ran back inside for a hot shower!

Hall at Mas Gorrall in Costa Brava Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Hall at Mas Gorrall in Costa Brava

Lunch on the sunny terrace

In the entrance hall hung a row of straw hats, waiting to be borrowed for a snooze in the sun or a walk around the garden. Although it was only April, the sun shone for us and we took full advantage of the warmth for lunches al fresco on the sheltered terrace. Feeling the sun on your back in the springtime when there’s still blossom on the fruit trees and wildflowers in the fields is one of the pleasures of being in Costa Brava.

Our Villa Mas Gorral through Charming Villas Heatheronhertravels.com

Lunch on the terrace at our Villa Mas Gorral through Charming Villas

After a day of walking the town walls in Girona, a seaside jaunt to Cadaques or a Dali inspired visit to Figueres we’d return to Mas Gorral to loll around on the white cotton sofas in the barn-like sitting room. Our hire car from Auto Europe was despatched to the local supermarket to return with mountains of food and all the cousins decided what we would eat and cooked it together.

At our villa Mas Gorral through Charming Villas Catalonia Heatheronhertravels.com

Dining room at our villa Mas Gorral through Charming Villas Catalonia

Time for dinner at the long table

Later books would be cleared from the long wooden table where the girls had been working on university assignments and the table was laid for dinner. During the day we’d tried the local specialities; dreamy ice cream from Rocambolesc in Girona, seafood tapas and local wine at Enoteca MF in Cadaques. But in the evening we’d fall back on our home-cooked favourites, chicken kebabs barbecued on the terrace or mountains of meatballs and pasta.

At our villa Mas Gorral through Charming Villas Catalonia Heatheronhertravels.com

Dinner at our villa Mas Gorral through Charming Villas Catalonia

On our last evening, however we took inspiration from the staff at Enoteca MF in Cadaques who we saw peeling a huge pile of red shrimps which were pulverised to make a shrimp carpaccio. In our version it was seafood linguine but the cousins pitched in to peel all the prawns from the supermarket.

At our villa Mas Gorral through Charming Villas Catalonia Heatheronhertravels.com

Sitting room at our villa Mas Gorral through Charming Villas Catalonia

Wine and cards in front of the fire

After a candle-lit dinner around the huge table, the fire was lit to take away the evening chill and we sat around playing cards and drinking local wine. The house became a backdrop for family conversations, catching up on news, planning bright futures. The card games were fircely contested, but at the end it’s not about the winning or losing but about the time we spend together. With our children flying the nest to carve their own paths in the world, these memories of time spent together become ever more precious.

At our villa Mas Gorral through Charming Villas Catalonia Heatheronhertravels.com

Evening at our villa Mas Gorral through Charming Villas Catalonia

All too soon it was time to leave our lovely villa at Mas Gorral. The views over the garden are still there, the teracotta roofs of Pontas below the house and the snow capped Pyrenees in the distance, waiting for the next guest.

Our Villa Mas Gorral through Charming Villas Heatheronhertravels.com

View from our Villa Mas Gorral through Charming Villas

As we reluctantly handed back the keys to Richard and drove to the airport past fields of yellow rapeseed scattered with poppies, the sun on the terrace was still warm in our memory. We’d had a chance to catch up, to cook together and splash in the pool. We’d recharged and soaked up the sunshine and made some memories to take home. Isn’t that what holidays are all about?

Have you any favourite holidays memories of spending time with your family? I’d love to hear them in the comments.

Near Pontas in Costa Brava Heatheronhertravels.com

Fields near Pontas in Costa Brava

More memories from Costa Brava

A driving tour of Costa Brava – Girona, Figueres and the Dali triangle
Lloret de Mar – sun, sea and so much more…
Val de Nuria – a Sunday stroll in the Pyrenees

Plan your stay in Costa Brava

Thanks to Charming Villas Catalonia for providing our villa Mas Gorral near Figueres. Charming Villas specialise in luxury and character villas in Catalonia from rustic villas in the countryside to modern coastal villas. They have over 80 villas to choose from and as Richard and Sara who run the company are based locally they are able to help with planning your holiday and on hand to sort out any issues.

Mas Gorral has 5 double bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, plenty of living space, a terrace, large garden and swimming pool. You can rent Mas Gorral through Charming Villas with rental rates starting in May at €2500 per week, rising to €3750 per week in high season. As Mas Gorral is in a rural location, we recommend that you hire a car to get around.

Book Mas Gorral through Charming Villas and follow them on Instagram | Facebook | Twitter

Auto Europe car in Costa BravaThanks to Auto Europe for providing our hire car for exploring Costa Brava. Auto Europe work with 20,000 car rental locations in 180 countries in Europe, Asia, Africa, Australia, as well as North and South America.

For more information to plan your holiday in Costa Brava, visit the Costa Brava Tourism Website and the Catalunya Tourism Website.

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Read about the memories we made in our villa stay in Costa Brava

This article is originally published at Heatheronhertravels.com – Read the original article here

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The Gower in Wales: find your perfect coastal walk and place to stay

Walking along cliff paths and blowing the cobwebs away on a breezy beach is one of my favourite things to do at the weekend, at any time of year and whatever the weather. I’ve been to the Gower Peninsula in South Wales quite a few times now, since my oldest was at university at Swansea, spending his time ‘studying’ the best surfing beaches of the Gower coast. Last weekend I was back with my husband Guy, my youngest and a couple of his friends, staying for a second time at a very stylish and comfortable holiday house called Promenade View in Mumbles which is a perfect base for exploring the coastal walks and gorgeous beaches of the Gower.

Walking on the Gower Peninsula in Wales Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

We started our walk at Pennard Cliffs

Arriving on the Friday night we made our grand plan of how to spend the weekend. We would take the bus to Pennard where we had finished our walk a couple of years earlier (read about it here), then walk as far as we could to a point where we could catch the bus back to Mumbles. It was a good plan, but with three teenage boys, a much deserved lie in and a late start on the Saturday morning, it was a plan that we soon had to abandon. At 11am, fearing that the best of the day would be gone if we didn’t get a move on, we decided to drive instead of take the bus and set off for the National Trust car park at Pennard.

Pennard Cliffs on the Gower, Wales Heatheronhertravels.com

Pennard Cliffs on the Gower, Wales

Leaving the car park, we followed the broad, grassy path along the edge of the cliff with patches of yellow flowering gorse, dwarf trees blown into windswept shapes and the waves crashing on the rocks below. The limestone cliffs are a natural habitat for many wildflowers, although it was a bit too early to see the pink clumps of thrift that bloom here later in the spring.

Pennard Cliffs on the Gower, Wales Heatheronhertravels.com

Pennard Cliffs on the Gower, Wales

The cliff top of this section of the Welsh coast is common land where the local farmers have the right to graze their livestock, although the only animals that we saw were dogs taking their owners for a walk and swooping seagulls. Soon Three Cliffs Bay came into view, the sun lighting up the mottled brown hillside and the few white cottages with grey slate roofs.

Pennard Cliffs on the Gower, Wales Heatheronhertravels.com

Pennard Cliffs on the Gower, is a favourite with dog walkers

Getting to Pennard Cliffs

The National Trust Car park at Southgate is about a 20 minute drive from Mumbles or 30 minute drive from Swansea centre and parking for the day costs £3. There are public toilets and a cafe by the car park and bus stop. The number 14 and 14A runs from Swansea to Pennard every 1-2 hours – bus map and information here.

Pennard Cliffs on the Gower, Wales Heatheronhertravels.com

Heather and Guy on Pennard Cliffs on the Gower

The scramble down to Pobbles Beach

Just before Three Cliffs Bay the path led down through the dunes of Pennard Burrows to the secluded Pobbles Beach. The short grass gave way to deep swathes of sand and the boys pretended to snowboard down through the dunes, while on the cliff above us, we could hear the knock and thwack of balls on Pennard Golf Course.

Pobbles Beach on the Gower, Wales Heatheronhertravels.com

The boys walk down to Pobbles beach on the Gower, Wales

Down on the beach we picked our way over boulders, stones and piles of driftwood until we reached the sand and the boys clambered over the rocks to a smaller section of beach where there was a sea cave that smugglers would have loved. The tide was coming in and as I stood there taking photos, I got caught out by a wave washing over my boots, jumped and nearly dropped my camera.

I had to call to the boys to come back round onto the main beach, before they got cut off by the sea but of course they were in no hurry. It would be all part of the adventure to scale the cliff face or climb over rocks risking the sheer drop below!

Pobbles Beach on the Gower, Wales Heatheronhertravels.com

View of Pobbles Beach on the Gower, Wales

The Photogenic Three Cliffs Bay

Scrambling up through the sand dunes from Pobbles beach we came down on the other side to Three Cliffs Bay, one most photographed beaches on the Gower. I’m sure it has been on many of those ‘best beaches in the world’ lists. We picked our way along a very narrow cliff path, although subsequently realised there were easier routes around the back of the sand dunes, and came sliding and slithering again down to the beach.

Three Cliffs Bay in the Gower, Wales Heatheronhertravels.com

Three Cliffs Bay in the Gower, Wales

A band of grey shale that marked the high tide mark stretched across the beach, behind it the valley through which the silvery ribbon of Pennard Pill river flowed into the sea. On the cliff above us sat the picturesque ruin of Pennard Castle that was built between the 12th and 14th centuries by Henry de Beaumont, the first Earl of Warwick, but later abandoned because of sand blowing in from the dunes and beach.

We sat on a log to rest a while then crossed the beach to where the shallow river could be crossed on stepping stones. Guy remembered how he had brought our daughter Sophie-Anne here with some friends when they were a lot younger, staying in the campsite up on the cliffs and they’d all come down to make a fire on the beach. What an wild adventure for tiddlers!

Three Cliffs Bay in the Gower, Wales Heatheronhertravels.com

Three Cliffs Bay in the Gower, Wales

Visiting Three Cliffs Bay

The beach here is not easily accessible except by walking unless you are staying at the Three Cliffs Bay Holiday Park where they have both camping and farm cottages. Parking is available at Pennard where we walked from or at the Gower Heritage Centre at Parkmill on the other side of the golf course.

Three Cliffs Bay in the Gower, Wales Heatheronhertravels.com

Stepping stones across the river at Three Cliffs Bay in the Gower, Wales

Had we continued, the path on the other side of Three Cliffs Bay would have brought us to the next beach at Oxwich Bay, another long sandy beach with easy parking and cafes at the far end, which is served by the 117 bus from Swansea. Looking out we could see the headland where the next bus stop would be and decided that it looked a very, very long way to walk to Oxwich. The executive decision was taken to turn back here and retrace our steps to the car. Our walk around the whole Gower would have to wait for another day.

Three Cliffs Bay in the Gower, Wales Heatheronhertravels.com

Three Cliffs Bay in the Gower, Wales

Returning by the same way we’d come, we clambered up through the dunes, wading through sand that resembled soft brown sugar and along the boardwalk that led through the spindly grass. Our walk back to Pennard was much quicker on the return since I had taken all my photos and we soon arrived back to our holiday house at Promenade View on the seafront at Mumbles.

Three Cliffs Bay in the Gower, Wales Heatheronhertravels.com

Three Cliffs Bay in the Gower, Wales

Where to stay on the Gower

Before I tell you what we got up to on the Sunday of our walking weekend, let me introduce you to our luxurious holiday house at Mumbles, called Promenade View. We’d stayed here a couple of years ago and loved everything about it, so I was really pleased when the owner Kim invited us back (read my review and watch the video here)

Promenade View Holiday House in Mumbles Heatheronhertravels.com

Promenade View Holiday House in Mumbles

Mumbles is the traditional seaside town that’s now a suburb of Swansea but was originally a small fishing village until the railway joined it to the city in the 19th century. The promenade that the house is named after runs from Mumbles right around Swansea Bay to the city and it’s a favourite stretch for joggers and cyclists.

Staying in Mumbles gives you the best of all worlds since there are plenty of shops, bars and restaurants, but it has the feel of a seaside village. Only a short drive or even walk to the end of the promenade and you are on the cliff paths heading for some of the most fabulous beaches in Wales.

Promenade View Holiday House in Mumbles Heatheronhertravels.com

Promenade View Holiday House in Mumbles

Guy and I had the first floor master bedroom while the boys took the two second floor bedrooms, each with its own en suite bathroom, making it ideal for a families or groups of friends to share. The ground floor sitting room was beautifully decorated in calm shades of cream and stone with wooden plantation shutters to give some privacy and there’s space to park your car right outside.

Promenade View Holiday House in Mumbles Heatheronhertravels.com

Promenade View Holiday House in Mumbles

At the back of the ground floor is the open plan kitchem with large dining table and a small patio garden where you can sit out and eat in sunny weather. The thing that I really love about this house is that you can open the shutters in the two front bedroom and sit in bed looking out over Swansea Bay while the occasional walker and cyclist passes by – really very hypnotic and relaxing.

For more information on one of the most stylish Gower Cottages around, check out the Promenade View Website and book through local cottage company Home from Home who offer many luxury Gower cottages like this one.

Rhossili on the Gower in Wales Heatheronhertravels.com

Rhossili on the Gower in Wales

Walking to Worm’s Head

Although we originally planned to continue our walk from Three Cliffs Bay, we decided that on Sunday we should really visit another of the best beaches in the Gower at Rhossili. Unfortunately the forecast sunshine failed to materialise but undaunted we drove for 30 minutes to reach Rhossili, at the furthest end of the Gower peninsula. We’d been there quite a few years ago on a family camping weekend (read about it here) when the kids were a lot smaller and spent a sunny day on the broad sandy beach playing cricket and generally lolling around.

The causeway at Worm's Head on the Gower, Wales Heatheronhertravels.com

The causeway at Worm’s Head on the Gower, Wales

On previous Gower holidays we’d never tried the walk to Worm’s Head, a jut (did I just invent that word?) of rock that is joined to the headland by a causeway. You need to check the times of the tide to be sure that the causeway will be open and you won’t be cut off. There’s a big sign and a coastguard’s hut to make sure you don’t do anything too foolhardy, but I’m sure that quite a few must get cut off, in fact we spotted a board outside the hut that told us how many. By pure chance we managed to time it perfectly and arrived at 11am with the causeway open for another couple of hours, which seemed plenty of time.

The causeway at Worm's Head on the Gower, Wales Heatheronhertravels.com

The causeway at Worm’s Head on the Gower, Wales

The first challenge was to clamber down from the grassy bank to a slope with uneven layers of rocks, pebbles and boulders. On the causeway, the rocks were topped by colonies of miniature mussels, looking as if a sea giant had slapped dollops of tar all over the causeway. I stuck to the area closer to the sea but it was impossible to avoid the mussels, everywhere tiny mussels, on every rock, in every nook and cranny although none of them big enough to make a decent moules marinière.

The causeway at Worm's Head on the Gower, Wales Heatheronhertravels.com

The causeway at Worm’s Head on the Gower, Wales

I kept an eye on the water lapping up on the rocks hoping to see one of the seals that swim near the causeway but none appeared. By the time I had stopped to photograph every mussel, whelk and limpet, the boys and Guy were way ahead of me and I decided to turn back, leaving Guy to make sure they all got back safely before the tide turned.

The causeway at Worm's Head on the Gower, Wales Heatheronhertravels.com

I decided to turn back on the causeway at Worm’s Head on the Gower, Wales

As I picked my way cautiously back across the causeway (definitely ankle twisting territory!) I remembered my friend telling me about the time when she was at Worm’s Head with small children frantically calling her older ones back before they got stuck on the wrong side of the causeway. I saw the binoculars at the coastguard’s hut and wondered whether they count them out and count them back in.

The causeway at Worm's Head on the Gower, Wales Heatheronhertravels.com

All safely back before the tide turns! On the causeway at Worm’s Head on the Gower, Wales

Soon I was relieved to see my crew making their way back and all were back just by 1.00 when the tide was due to turn and flood the causeway. Since it was past lunchtime we found a cosy Gower hotel and had a plate or two of chips at the Worm’s Head Hotel before heading back to Promenade View for a late sandwich lunch.

Back at Mumbles Promenade

Annoyingly, as soon as we drove away from Rhossili, the brooding grey cloud cleared and we started to see patches of blue sky at last. On the Mumbles promenade families were out enjoying the sunshine, strolling up past the boats towards the pier to treat themselves to an ice cream.

The Promenade at Mumbles Heatheronhertravels.com

The Promenade at Mumbles

Sadly we had run out of time to join them on this weekend, but I’m sure there will be another installment of the ‘Walking around the Gower’ project, when we return to walk just a little further and explore more of those glorious Gower beaches.

The Promenade at Mumbles Heatheronhertravels.com

The Promenade at Mumbles

Visitor Information

For more information about staying at Promenade View Holiday Home check out their website and follow them on Facebook and Twitter.

You can book Gower holidays through Home from Home holiday cottages who specialise in Gower holiday cottages and have a great many lovely ones to choose from. Follow them on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram

To find out more about what’s going on in the area of Mumbles and Swansea Bay check out the Visit Swansea Bay website and follow on their social channels Facebook | Twitter | Instagram

For more holidays in Wales check out the Visit Wales tourism website and follow their social media channels Facebook | Twitter | Instagram

More things to do in Wales

A weekend on the Gower Peninsula at Langland and Caswell Bay
Lovely Laugherne – on the Dylan Thomas trail in South Wales
An Ugly Lovely Town – Dylan Thomas in Swansea

Find all my Photos from the weekend in my Flickr Album: Mumbles and Gower

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Read about walking around the Gower Peninsula in Wales

Thanks to Kim at Promenade View Holiday House for hosting our weekend stay.

This article is originally published at Heatheronhertravels.com – Read the original article here

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Sea views and springtime in St Mawes – our weekend in Cornwall

There’s something magical about waking up in Cornwall in springtime with a view of the Fal estuary from your bedroom window. “Tide’s in” says Guy as we open the curtains and lie in bed watching a tanker chug past St Anthony’s lighthouse and the St Mawes ferry heading for Falmouth.

Sea Views and springtime in St Mawes, Cornwall

From our luxury holiday house, the aptly named Dreamcatchers booked through St Mawes Retreats, we have a view of the sea over the slate rooftops of the cottages, where people are waking up this fine morning. I can walk out from the living room, through the French windows, onto the deck with a cup of coffee in hand and bask in the spring sunshine, just drinking in the view.

In spring the sea has a wild and mesmerising charm, as little ruffles of white speed across the grey-blue water and subside again. I’ve stayed here before of course, at Stargazers, another St Mawes Retreats property and have been hearing the call of the sea and Cornwall ever since – read about our last visit here.

I hope you enjoy the video below from our spring weekend break at Dreamcatchers in Cornwall with St Mawes Retreats

If you can’t see the video above of our stay with St Mawes Retreats, see it on my blog here or Youtube here and please do subscribe using the button above

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Dreamcatchers luxury holiday house with St Mawes Retreats Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Dreamcatchers luxury holiday house with St Mawes Retreats

Dreamcatchers is one of five luxurious holiday houses in the St Mawes Retreats portfolio, four of which are in St Mawes itself, the fifth in nearby Fowey and all have spectacular views of the sea. The house is beautifully furnished with oversized Designers Guild florals, white walls and a sprinkling of sparkle and glamour. It’s light and airy yet warm and cosy and with those fabulous sea views, you really want to just curl up on the sofa or sit on the deck with a glass of wine and never leave. The houses are perfect for groups of friends like us who want to get away from our city lives for a relaxing short break by the sea.

Dreamcatchers luxury holiday house in St Mawes, Corwall through St Mawes Retreats  Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Dreamcatchers luxury holiday house in St Mawes, Corwall through St Mawes Retreats

Luxury and the Wow! factor

While we’re staying at Dreamcatchers for the weekend I reflect on how ‘luxury’ means different things to different people. For the girls in our party it’s the fabulous decor, the huge baths and walk-in showers within the bedrooms that have the Wow! factor. “I want to go back home and paint everything white!” declares my sister-in-law Clare as she dreams of recreating that ‘by the sea’ feeling. “I love all the colour” sighs my friend Penny and reminisces about wet camping weekends in Cornwall of the past that didn’t quite have the Dreamcatchers magic.

Dreamcatchers luxury holiday house in St Mawes, Corwall through St Mawes Retreats Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

The bedrooms at Dreamcatchers luxury holiday house in St Mawes, Corwall through St Mawes Retreats

As for the men, the house brings out the cave man spirit as Guy’s eyes light up at the wood burning stove, with logs set by ready for him to stoke it up. Meanwhile, my brother-in-law Andrew spots the enormous gas fired BBQ on the deck, and immediately starts planning our dinner around it, since he’s been known to cook the Christmas turkey on the BBQ before. My teenage son and friends fiddle with the sound system that defeats the rest of us and are duly impressed by the flat screen TVs in every room – there’s even the one above the bath in their own en suite bathroom.

Dreamcatchers luxury holiday house in St Mawes, Corwall through St Mawes Retreats Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

The living rooms at Dreamcatchers luxury holiday house in St Mawes, Corwall through St Mawes Retreats

Dreamcatchers is beautifully liveable as a holiday house to relax with friends and family. The house seems to swallow us all effortlessly, with a second sitting room that the teenagers can make their den.  We lounge around on the squashy leather sofas, play cards, drink wine, admire the twinkly lights in the oak staircase, gaze out to sea and generally catch up on everyone’s news.

When it comes to mealtimes, the kitchen has so many cupboards that we spend ages opening them all just to find a coffee cup or a plate. With two large fridges, a wine chiller, a super duper coffee machine to bring out your inner barista and pretty mother-of-pearl mosaic tiles this kitchen is made for a party.

St Mawes in Cornwall staying with St Mawes Retreats Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

St Mawes in Cornwall staying with St Mawes Retreats

Along the seafront

On Saturday morning, we wander down to the harbour at St Mawes that we had surveyed from the deck of Dreamcatchers. The narrow seafront road is lined with whitewashed cottages with blue shutters and daffodil window boxes and further on towards the Tresanton Hotel we pass pretty pastel villas with fanciful sea-faring names. I can’t resist stopping in the Waterside Gallery, filled with lovely glassware, paintings and sculptures from Cornish artists where I give the wooden seagull sculpture that hangs from the ceiling a pull to make it sway hypnotically up and down.

St Mawes harbour in Cornwall staying with St Mawes Retreats Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

St Mawes harbour in Cornwall

St Mawes Harbour

Around the harbour at St Mawes there are plenty of pubs, cafes and gift shops, although in March everywhere is quiet since the main holiday season starts at Easter. I imagine that in August the village is packed out but I quite like visiting places like this out of season before the crowds arrive. A racing gig comes onto the beach since the all-female crew have been out training and we watch them heave the boat out of the water.

In the past these pilot gigs were working boats, used to take a pilot out to a ship coming into the estuary and the race was to see who could get to the ship first to win the business. Now the pilot gigs are raced for sport along the Cornish coast and you’ll spot the Rosaland Gig club in the centre of St Mawes by the vintage petrol pumps standing outside.

By the harbour in St Mawes in Cornwall staying with St Mawes Retreats Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

By the harbour in St Mawes in Cornwall

The St Mawes Ferry

Last time we visited St Mawes, I’d seen the blue ferry passing by, but there were so many other places to explore that we didn’t have time to try it out. The ferry has the appearance of an old fashioned wooden toy boat, only life size, and it runs every day of the year but Christmas (more information here). On boarding the ferry we sat in the sunshine on the open top deck, enjoying the wind on our face and the fantastic views of St Mawes Castle and the boats in the estuary as we made the 15 minute journey across to Falmouth.

St Mawes ferry to Falmouth Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Taking the St Mawes ferry to Falmouth

Reaching Falmouth Harbour

Falmouth is a town that faces a deep natural harbour with a history that has for centuries been linked to the sea. As we approached on the St Mawes Ferry, we could see the marina with industrial cranes where they build Pendennis superyachts and the castle on the headland that mirrors the one on the other side at St Mawes to protect the estuary. The tide was out with seagulls making a constant shriek and shrill as they picked over the seaweed while the water lapped against the quayside.

Falmouth which we visited on the ferry from St Mawes when staying with St Mawes Retreats Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Falmouth which we visited on the ferry from St Mawes

From the ferry pier we turned left and passed a range of unremarkable high street shops, but further on these gave way to smaller art galleries and cafes, with plenty of places to buy your Cornish pasty or fish and chips. We thought Falmouth seemed like a great place to live, a proper town with plenty of charm without being too touristy or bijoux. We wandered past the Georgian shop buildings painted in shades of pale grey, lemon and sky blue with bunting strung between them fluttering  jauntily in the wind. From the main street we could follow small alleyways, leading up the hill or down to the sea, giving a tantalising glimpse of blue between the buildings.

Falmouth which we visited on the ferry from St Mawes when staying with St Mawes Retreats Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Down the alleyways of Falmouth with a glimpse of the sea

A Cornish pasty and a pint

This being the heartland of the Cornish pasty we were planning to try one for lunch, preferrably combined with a jug of Cornish Ale and a view of the sea. Down on Custom House Quay we spotted a sign in the pasty shop that said we could eat them in the pub opposite called “The Front bar on the quay” and entered the old style pub with a bar lined with Cornish ales and ciders that made Guy’s eyes light up. To get the view of the sea we had to sit on a bench outside, with a fine harbour view, only slightly marred by the constant stream of cars coming down the lane to park.

Falmouth which we visited on the ferry from St Mawes when staying with St Mawes Retreats Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Lunch with a pint of Cornish ale and a harbour view in Falmouth

Having eaten our pasties, I went to explore the interesting Watermen’s Gallery with my sister-in-law, Clare and got chatting to the artist in residence, Sophi Beharrell who was working on a half finished painting of a cliff scene in Cornwall. There were many lovely Cornish seascapes on the wall, and other artistic gifts, but we made do with buying a few greeting cards of the paintings.

Falmouth which we visited on the ferry from St Mawes when staying with St Mawes Retreats Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Falmouth which we visited on the ferry from St Mawes when staying with St Mawes Retreats

St Mawes Castle

Returning to St Mawes on the ferry, we decide to extend our walk to St Mawes Castle, following the lane of well kept Edwardian villas, pastel pink or bright white with freshly painted blue windows. It’s rather sad that almost all seemed to be holiday homes, with not a light on and no-one at home. I wondered what it’s like to be a local around here, seeing these houses go empty for much of the year.

St Mawes Castle, Cornwall staying with St Mawes Retreats Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

St Mawes Castle, Cornwall staying with St Mawes Retreats

Further on, we reached St Mawes Castle, a petite fortress built by Henry VIII to guard the strategic Fal estuary from invasion, matched by its twin of Pendennis castle on the other side above Falmouth. The castle is now run by English Heritage, although it was just closing as we arrived, so we didn’t go in but continued up the muddly lane with the sea on our left. Here we passed more smart houses, with gardens full of rosemary, hydrangeas and camelias that would withstand the sea air, but again found all the houses in darkness. The path would have taken us to St Just in Rosaland but the fields were muddy and dusk was falling so we returned to Dreamcatchers for the scones and clotted cream tea that had been left for us by St Mawes Retreats.

Cream tea – Jam first or cream first?

If you ever meet a Cornishman be aware that the innocent cream tea has become a hot topic over how it should best be eaten. In Devon it seems that the scone is always spread with cream first then the jam on top while in Cornwall it’s jam first and cream on the top and there’s heated debate over which way is best. I remained impartial, tried both and found it delicious either way.

Cream ea at St Mawes Retreats, Cornwall Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Cream ea at St Mawes Retreats, Cornwall

To the Lighthouse

On Sunday the blue skies and spring sunshine had turned to grey cloud and light drizzle but we pressed on with our visit to St Anthony’s Lighthouse which I’d visited on previous trips to St Mawes. In summer you can get a 10 minute ferry ride straight across from St Mawes, but we had to drive the 20 minutes around the headland and parked in the National Trust carpark at the end of the road.

St Anthony's Head lighthouse in Cornwall Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

St Anthony’s Head lighthouse in Cornwall

St Anthony Head is the site of many Second World War fortifications, concrete bunkers and observation posts with a fine view over the estuary. We walked down through the sheltered pines to the path to St Anthony’s lighthouse, which featured as the lighthouse in the TV puppet show, Fraggle Rock. You can’t get close up to the lighthouse which is still in use although there is a holiday cottage there that can be rented. We retraced our steps and walked along the sheltered path to the beach of Great Molunan, walking past the first cove and scrambling down to the next with the help of a rope. The tide was out with only us and a couple of kayakers on the beach and a view back to St Anthony’s lighthouse.

Walk to the beach near St Anthony's Head Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Walk to the beach near St Anthony’s Head

After our blustery walk we drove back to St Mawes, diverting for lunch at Portscatho at the Plume of Feathers pub in the heart of the village.We installed ourself in a cosy side room and ordered some hearty pub fare – both the fish and chips and the roast Sunday lunch were excellent and ticked all the boxes for a proper Cornish lunch.

Fish and Chips at the Plume of Feathers in Portscatho, Cornwall Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Fish and Chips at the Plume of Feathers in Portscatho, Cornwall

Back at Dreamcatchers it was time to pack our bags again and take a  final look out at the window at those sea views, wishing we could stay a few more days. There’s something therapeutic about being within sight of the sea, the constant motion of the waves breaking on the rocks, the wind blowing away the mental cobwebs, and the rhythm of life on the water with the boats passing by. Our life in Bristol required us back but I know that it’s won’t be long before I feel the call of Cornwall, St Mawes and the sea again.

More information for your short break with St Mawes Retreats

St Mawes Retreats offers luxury holiday accommodation in Cornwall, with 4 properties in St Mawes and 1 in Fowey, sleeping between 4 and 12 guests. The larger houses are ideal for groups of family and friends to share and the St Mawes properties are all close to each other so are ideal for extended family stays and celebration events. The houses are available for short breaks and weekend stays in spring and autumn at surprisingly affordable rates, with special low occupancy rates for smaller groups in the winter, and the cost per person is well below that of a similar standard boutique hotel.

Dreamcatchers where we stayed has 5 en suite bedrooms, 2 sitting rooms, breathtaking sea views from the living rooms and master bedrooms, a south facing garden and is a short walk from St Mawes village on the beautiful Rosalind Peninsula. Dreamcatchers can be booked for short breaks from £952 in spring and autumn with low occupancy discounts in winter.

To book visit the St Mawes Retreats website or ring owner Amanda Selby on 0800 0886622 to discuss your requirements, as there are many concierge services available such as a private chef, beauty treatments, shopping services, childcare and help with organising your celebration event. For news and special offers follow St Mawes Retreats on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Pinterest |

Thanks to St Mawes Retreats for hosting Heather and friends for their weekend stay in Dreamcatchers.

More Cornish adventures

Is this the perfect sea view? Our luxury weekend at St Mawes in Cornwall
Cliff walks and country houses in Cornwall
Just me and the boys down on the farm in Cornwall

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Read about our luxury weekend break by the sea at St Mawes in Cornwall

This article is originally published at Heatheronhertravels.com – Read the original article here

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