How to spend a perfect day in Mahón, Menorca

May 19, 2016 by  
Filed under Balearics, Europe, Leisure, Sightseeing, Spain

Menorca is the smallest and calmest of the Balearic islands, a haven for lovers of understated luxury. It’s a place that doesn’t like to boast too much about its charms, but is full of history, fashion and great food. If you’re flying in to Menorca, or visiting on a cruise, why not take a day or so to explore Mahón, the elegant capital of the island. For those who enjoy mellow old buildings, stylish shopping and lazy seafood lunches by the port, here are the ingredients for your perfect day in Mahón.

How to spend the perfect day in Mahon Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

A boat tour around the harbour

Start your day in Mahón with a relaxing 1 hour boat tour around the harbour, to dip into the naval history of the area. Because of the city’s deep harbour and strategic position in the Mediterranean, the British dominated the island for much of the 18th century and have especially left their stamp on Mahón. Buy your ticket at the kiosk at the bottom of the steps close to the cruise terminal and take your seat on the top deck for the best view, although you can retreat downstairs if it’s a bit too windy. As you pass the main sites of interest, there’s a commentary in several different languages including English.

Boat trip around Mahon harbour Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Boat trip around Mahon harbour

Now if you ask me for every detail of the harbour history it’s a bit hazy as I was taking too many photos, but to start with we passed by some of the swanky villas where the wealthy folk of Mahón live. We passed the English Arsenal, painted red as was the custom for military buildings, and further on Quarantine Island with a hospital where those with infectious diseases were treated. I imagine that those who went in wondered whether they would ever emerge alive. Near the harbour entrance, the water got quite choppy as we passed  briefly to the open sea. As soon as we turned around the water calmed again, and we returned past Cales Font, the pretty harbour of Es Castell which was the 18th century British garrison town.

The harbour boat tour is run by 2 main operators, the Yellow Catamaran and the Don Juan Catamaran which cost around €12 per adult (cheaper if you book online). Between them they run every half an hour throughout the day, selling drinks and snacks on board.

Mahon Harbour tour Photo- Heatheronhertravels.com

Boat tour of Mahon harbour

Elegant buildings overlook the harbour

Back on dry land, let’s climb up those white flights of steps to start to explore Mahón properly. As you near the top, look up to your right to see the elegant Art Nouveau facade of Casa Mercadel and up on your left there are plenty of viewpoints where you can have a drink with a view over the port. To your immediate left are two huge trees with roots like an elephant foot which are a well known landmark.

View of Mahon in menorca Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

View of Mahon in Menorca

The elegant Casa Mercadel was one of the homes owned by a noble Menorcan family and was built in on the site of an ancient castle that overlooked the harbour, now housing a cultural centre.

Casa Mercadel in Mahon, Menorca Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Casa Mercadel in Mahon, Menorca

A mid-morning snack at the fish market?

In Placa d’Espanya at the top of the steps, you’ll find the Mercat del Peix or fish market with all the lovely fresh fish on sale until 2pm (closed Sunday and Monday).

Fish Market in Mahon, Menorca Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

The bright red prawns and spiny lobster are used to make the lobster caldereta and other seafood dishes that you can order at restaurants along the seafront. Despite all the groups of tourists trooping through to take photos, the stall holders were very good humoured and relaxed.

In the fishmarket at Mahon Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

In the fishmarket at Mahon

Tapas with a glass of wine

Walking past the fish you’ll come around to the other side of the market with stalls selling tapas, snacks and drinks. If you’re ready for a mid-morning break, this is the place to grab a drink and a snack, sitting at one of the stools inside or tables outside in the courtyard. On a Saturday lunchtime the place was buzzing with locals meeting their friends for a glass of wine and a chat.

Tapas in the fishmarket Photo- Heatheronhertravels.com

Tapas in the fishmarket of Mahon

The tapas typically cost between €1 and €3 and you can just point at whatever takes your fancy. I loved all the glistening olives and the appetising slices of bread topped with onions, peppers and anchovies. There was also a stall selling tasty seafood croquettes so I had to try a few of those as well, including one that was black with squid ink.

Tapas in the fish market of Mahon Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Tapas in the fish market of Mahon

A little further up the square next to the fish market is the Carmelite cloisters which has been converted to a covered market selling everything from fruit and veg to shoes and local food specialities. Worth knowing that there’s a public WC here as I didn’t find one anywhere else in the old town.

The cloisters in Mahon Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

The cloisters in Mahon

Dip into the history of Mahon at Ca n’Oliver

If you’d enjoy visiting historic houses, pay a visit to Centre d’Art I d’Historia Hernandez Sanz at Ca n’Oliver, a mansion which belonged to one of the most powerful families of Mahon in the 18th and 19th centuries. This gorgeous house now houses the Hernandez Sanz collection of artworks which are on display over several floors around the ornate wrought iron staircase with a painted fresco to impress you in the lobby.

Staircase at Ca n'Oliver in Mahon Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Staircase at Ca n’Oliver in Mahon

The paintings, maps and displays give insights into the British legacy on Menorca as well as the Oliver family who made their money as merchants in the Mediterranean and supplied the military in Mahón. I especially enjoyed the painted ceilings with religious and classical scenes in many of the rooms, designed to show the wealth and taste of the family who lived here.

Centre d’Art I d’Historia Hernandez Sanz at Ca n’Oliver, Anuncivay Street 2. Open daily except Monday 10-1.30pm and on Thursday, Friday, Saturday also 6-8pm.

Ca n' Oliver in Mahon Photo: Heatheronhertravels

Ca n’ Oliver in Mahon

The Museum of Menorca in Mahon

Another fascinating place to visit is the Museum of Menorca in the old Franciscan monastery which was built in the baroque style at the end of the 17th century but confiscated in 1835. The Museum was closed for renovation when I visited but I was still able to see the beautifully preserved cloisters and visit an interesting exhibition about the Talayotic culture on Menorca explaining the background of some of the stone burial chambers and settlements I’d seen in different parts of the island.

Museum of Menorca in Mahon Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Museum of Menorca in Mahon

Normally you can also see rooms which cover the history of Menorca from the earliest times, through the 18th century when the island was occupied variously by the English, French and Spanish, to the 20th century when the industries of shoe and jewellery making replaced shipbuilding.

Museum of Menorca, Avinguda Doctor Guardia, Open daily 10am – 2pm and some evenings. Closed Mondays. Normally €2.40 but free during renovation.

Cloisters in the Museum of Menorca Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Cloisters in the Museum of Menorca

A leisurely lunch by the Port

By around 1.30 the shops and museums will be starting to close so it’s time to find somewhere to have a leisurely lunch. Of course there are plenty of bars and cafes in the old town but a great alternative is to walk back down to the main port area where you’ll find a string of bars and restaurants overlooking the marina.

The Port of Mahon Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

The Port of Mahon

Settle in to a table with a view of the harbour, so you can people-watch from behind your designer sunglasses and oggle a few of those expensive boats. Most restaurants have a well-priced set menu at lunchtime that includes 3 courses, wine and bread with both seafood and meat options. We really enjoyed La Minerva (Carrer Moll de Llevant, 87) which has a nice terrace and tried their Arroz, a cross between soup and risotto with rice and seafood in a rich sauce, which is what Menorcan families like to eat on a Sunday.

Seafood in Mahon Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Seafood in Mahon

A wander around the old town streets

After lunch most of the shops will be shut until around 4.30pm, so it’s a good time to wander around the streets of the old town while they are less crowded and admire the mellow stone buildings. Turn your back on the fish market and walk up towards Placa de la Constitucia to see the Town Hall of Mahón with the clock presented by the English Governor, Richard Kane.

The old town hall of Mahon Photo Heatheronhertravels.com

The old town hall of Mahon

In the square is a bar called Boinder, named after the Menorcan term for the overhanging bay windows which you’ll see in many of the older houses around town. They are a legacy of the English, along with sash windows, door latches and highly polished brass door knockers. I have quite a collection of door-knocker photos!

Old door knocker in Mahon Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Old door knocker in Mahon

From here follow Carrer Isabel II which runs parallel to the port and look out for the narrow passages between the houses that lead to viewpoints over the port. There are three that I found, the final one being at the end of the street where you’ll reach the Museum of Menorca.

View over the port of Mahon Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

View over the port of Mahon

The influence of the British on Mahon

On the right hand side as you walk up Carrer Isabel II is the impressive Governor’s Residence, which was adopted by British Governor Richard Kane in 1722 when he moved the island’s capital from Cuitadella to Mahón. Although Cuitadella had been the ancient capital of the island, he found it too inconvenient to travel back and forth from one end of the island to the other, since the English fleet was based in Mahon.

The Governor's Residence in Mahon Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

The Governor’s Residence in Mahon

From the town hall, another interesting street to explore is Carrer de Sant Roc with some of the oldest houses owned by the noble families of Menorca leading to the gateway of Sant Roc which was once part of the city wall. The metal bands on the ground near the tower mark the line of where the city wall once stood. The gate overlooks a pleasant square, Plaça Bastio with café terraces and a children’s playground in the centre, so if you have children you’ll be able to sit with a drink and watch them play happily (at least that’s the theory).

Arc de Sant Roc in Mahon Photo Heatheronhertravels.com

Arc de Sant Roc in Mahon

A girl can never have too many shoes

Once the shops open later in the afternoon, it could be time do some souvenir shopping along the main shopping street of Carrer Hannover. Menorca has become a centre of quality shoe production and as we know a girl can never have too many shoes! The Avarca sandals that you’ll see in almost every shop were originally made with soles of old tyres but are now a high fashion item with many sparkly and colourful variations. Also look out for Pretty Ballerinas, a high fashion brand that is based on the island – their main shop is in the port area.

Sandals in Mahon, Menorca Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Sandals in Mahon, Menorca

Don’t go home until you’ve tried the cheese!

You can’t go home without trying the traditional Mahón-Menorca cheese which has a protected designation so it can only be made with milk from the island. The taste varies depending on how long the cheese has been matured and you’ll tell the artizan cheeses by the wrinkles made by the cloths in which they are wrapped. Around town there are quite a few shops that will let you have a taste before you buy and one of the best is Autentic, a deli shop on Plaça de s’Esplanada which has a good range of cheese, sausages and other produce of Menorca such as honey and flavoured liqueurs.

Mahon cheese in Menorca Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Mahon cheese in Menorca

Is it time for a drink yet?

At some point in the day you will want to taste some of the local gin which was another happy British introduction. In the past there were many distilleries on Menorca to keep the sailors satisfied, but now only Xoriguer remains. They have several shops around town but a good place to try their gin is in the main distillery on the harbourfront near the cruise terminal. Through the glass windows you can see the stills in operation and you are free to taste a range of the different gins and flavoured liqueurs that they produce and sell here.

Tasting the Xoriguer gin distillery Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Tasting the Xoriguer gin distillery

The local way with gin is to mix it with fizzy lemonade to make a Pomada, deceptively refreshing in the summer and served in vaste quantities at all the fiestas on Menorca. You might want to try it as an aperitif in one of the bars once you’ve finished your shopping.

Pomada, the gin and lemon drink aperitif on Menorca Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Pomada, the gin and lemon drink aperitif on Menorca

Dinner at Es Castells

Of course there are plenty of places to eat in Mahón, but for a change of scene why not take a 10 minute taxi ride to Es Castell where there are lots of restaurants around the pretty harbour of Cales Fonts. Take some time to look aound the town square which was once a parade ground, with the red painted military buildings, before settling into a table at whichever restaurant takes your fancy.

Boats in the harbour at Cales Fonts Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Boats in the harbour at Cales Fonts

Time for bed at Hotel Artiem Capri

Having enjoyed the sunset and fresh seafood for dinner, a taxi will return you to your hotel in Mahón. I stayed at the very pleasant Hotel Capri close to Plaça de s’Esplanada and a 15 minute walk from the port. My room was spacious and modern and there is a lovely rooftop pool (which sadly I was too busy sightseeing to try out). The hotel is part of the Artiem Hotel group which has many excellent hotels around the island including the Hotel Artiem Audax in Cala Galdana where I also enjoyed staying.

Wherever you stay I hope you have a perfectly restful end to your perfect day in Mahón!

Hotel Artiem Capri in Mahon, Menorca Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Hotel Artiem Capri in Mahon, Menorca

Hotel Artiem Capri, Caller San Esteban, 8, Mahón, Menorca.

Compare prices and book hotels in Mahón on my Hotels Booking page powered by Hotels Combined.

Hotel artiem Capri in Mahon, Menorca Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Hotel Artiem Capri in Mahon, Menorca

Have you visited Mahón or Menorca? What were your favourite Menorcan moments?

Visitor Information for Menorca and Mahon

To plan your holiday in Menorca and Mahón visit the Menorca Tourism website or follow them on social media: Twitter @Turismhttp://www.menorca.esoMenorca | Facebook | Instagram

For holidays in other parts of Spain you can find more information at www.Spain.inf0 or follow them on social media: Twitter @Spain_inUK | Facebook | Instagram

If you need a guide to show you the sites of Mahon and Menorca, I can highly recommend Luis Amella of Menorca Guides

Thanks to Menorca Tourism for hosting my stay in Menorca, in a project in partnership with Spain Tourism, Menorca Tourism and Travelator Media

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Holiday memories from our villa in Costa Brava

“I could lie here and look at those mountains for hours” said Guy, as he sank into the easy chair in the corner of our bedroom. From Mas Gorral, our villa in Costa Brava, we could look over the countryside to the Pyrenees, the rising sun lighting up the teracotta rooftiles and the mellow stone of the farmhouses in the distance. The small town of Pontos lay below us, with birds chirping and a view of the pine forest where we never did manage to go for a walk. These are the memories that you bring back from a holiday and turn over in your mind when it’s raining in Bristol!

Our villa in Costa Brava Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

We were staying at Mas Gorral through Charming Villas Catalonia, a company that specialises in luxury villas that are full of character, in the Costa Brava region of Catalunya. Richard and Sara who run the company are based nearby in Besalu and give the villas a personal touch, helping you choose the villa that suits your needs and are on hand to sort out any issues that arise.

At our villa Mas Gorral through Charming Villas Catalonia Heatheronhertravels.com

At our villa Mas Gorral through Charming Villas Catalonia

I hope you enjoy the video below about Mas Gorral with Charming Villas Catalonia

If you can’t see the video above about our villa in Catalonia see it on my blog here or Youtube here and please do subscribe using the button above

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Rustic Chic in our Costa Brava Villa

Our five bedroom villa, Mas Gorral was an old rambling farmhouse that easily accommodated our party of nine, made up of our family as well as Guy’s sister and family. I enjoyed imagining the history of this place, how rooms had been added to over the years, to suit the needs and ambitions of various owners. With everything built of local stone, bound together by ochre mortar, teracotta roof tiles and green creepers clothing the walls, it was difficult to tell what was original and what was modern.

At our villa Mas Gorral through Charming Villas Catalonia Heatheronhertravels.com

Bedroom at our villa Mas Gorral through Charming Villas Catalonia

Inside the theme was rustic chic, with mottled plaster walls left natural in places, in others painted creams and yellows. Exposed beams held up the ceiling with stone sinks in the kitchen and three bathrooms. Every room was huge, with imposing antique armoires and chests of drawers to match the scale of the house.

At our villa Mas Gorral through Charming Villas Catalonia Heatheronhertravels.com

At our villa Mas Gorral through Charming Villas Catalonia

Quirky artwork and furnishings

From the eclectic furnishings I imagined that the owners had travelled far and wide; a black Chinese laquer cupboard, a carved Asian wooden chest and a large leather topped desk that wouldn’t be out of place in an English gentleman’s library. The quirky feel continued in the bold, colourful artworks – verging on the surreal, and inspired perhaps by Salvador Dali who was born just down the road in Figueres.

Painting in Mas Gorral with Charming Villas

Painting in Mas Gorral with Charming Villas

On the landing a larger-than-life lady in an aviator’s helmet, surrounded by startled cherubs; is she kissing one of them or trying eat it? The long legs of a woman diving into a hat were propped near the kitchen and in the dining room we are greeted by the back of a reclining woman with ripples of creamy flesh.

At our villa Mas Gorral through Charming Villas Catalonia Heatheronhertravels.com

Sitting room at our villa Mas Gorral through Charming Villas Catalonia

A bracing swim in the pool

On the green lawn below the house, our swimming pool overlooked the valley and the forest. Being from England we are determined to make the most of every ray of sunshine and the girls were dressed as if for the hottest of August days in skimpy tops, loose flowing skirts and strappy sandals. They lay on the sunloungers ignoring the tramontana wind but after a while were forced to retreat to a more sheltered spot on the upper terrace.

At our villa Mas Gorral through Charming Villas Catalonia Heatheronhertravels.com

Swimming pool at our villa Mas Gorral through Charming Villas Catalonia

We gathered around the pool daring each other to go in. A toe dipped in the water told us it was not going to be warm, it was April after all!  My son took a plunge and dive bombed in, splashing everyone else. Then the girls followed, surfacing from the cold water, eyes wide with the shock. A brisk couple of lengths and they ran back inside for a hot shower!

Hall at Mas Gorrall in Costa Brava Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Hall at Mas Gorrall in Costa Brava

Lunch on the sunny terrace

In the entrance hall hung a row of straw hats, waiting to be borrowed for a snooze in the sun or a walk around the garden. Although it was only April, the sun shone for us and we took full advantage of the warmth for lunches al fresco on the sheltered terrace. Feeling the sun on your back in the springtime when there’s still blossom on the fruit trees and wildflowers in the fields is one of the pleasures of being in Costa Brava.

Our Villa Mas Gorral through Charming Villas Heatheronhertravels.com

Lunch on the terrace at our Villa Mas Gorral through Charming Villas

After a day of walking the town walls in Girona, a seaside jaunt to Cadaques or a Dali inspired visit to Figueres we’d return to Mas Gorral to loll around on the white cotton sofas in the barn-like sitting room. Our hire car from Auto Europe was despatched to the local supermarket to return with mountains of food and all the cousins decided what we would eat and cooked it together.

At our villa Mas Gorral through Charming Villas Catalonia Heatheronhertravels.com

Dining room at our villa Mas Gorral through Charming Villas Catalonia

Time for dinner at the long table

Later books would be cleared from the long wooden table where the girls had been working on university assignments and the table was laid for dinner. During the day we’d tried the local specialities; dreamy ice cream from Rocambolesc in Girona, seafood tapas and local wine at Enoteca MF in Cadaques. But in the evening we’d fall back on our home-cooked favourites, chicken kebabs barbecued on the terrace or mountains of meatballs and pasta.

At our villa Mas Gorral through Charming Villas Catalonia Heatheronhertravels.com

Dinner at our villa Mas Gorral through Charming Villas Catalonia

On our last evening, however we took inspiration from the staff at Enoteca MF in Cadaques who we saw peeling a huge pile of red shrimps which were pulverised to make a shrimp carpaccio. In our version it was seafood linguine but the cousins pitched in to peel all the prawns from the supermarket.

At our villa Mas Gorral through Charming Villas Catalonia Heatheronhertravels.com

Sitting room at our villa Mas Gorral through Charming Villas Catalonia

Wine and cards in front of the fire

After a candle-lit dinner around the huge table, the fire was lit to take away the evening chill and we sat around playing cards and drinking local wine. The house became a backdrop for family conversations, catching up on news, planning bright futures. The card games were fircely contested, but at the end it’s not about the winning or losing but about the time we spend together. With our children flying the nest to carve their own paths in the world, these memories of time spent together become ever more precious.

At our villa Mas Gorral through Charming Villas Catalonia Heatheronhertravels.com

Evening at our villa Mas Gorral through Charming Villas Catalonia

All too soon it was time to leave our lovely villa at Mas Gorral. The views over the garden are still there, the teracotta roofs of Pontas below the house and the snow capped Pyrenees in the distance, waiting for the next guest.

Our Villa Mas Gorral through Charming Villas Heatheronhertravels.com

View from our Villa Mas Gorral through Charming Villas

As we reluctantly handed back the keys to Richard and drove to the airport past fields of yellow rapeseed scattered with poppies, the sun on the terrace was still warm in our memory. We’d had a chance to catch up, to cook together and splash in the pool. We’d recharged and soaked up the sunshine and made some memories to take home. Isn’t that what holidays are all about?

Have you any favourite holidays memories of spending time with your family? I’d love to hear them in the comments.

Near Pontas in Costa Brava Heatheronhertravels.com

Fields near Pontas in Costa Brava

More memories from Costa Brava

A driving tour of Costa Brava – Girona, Figueres and the Dali triangle
Lloret de Mar – sun, sea and so much more…
Val de Nuria – a Sunday stroll in the Pyrenees

Plan your stay in Costa Brava

Thanks to Charming Villas Catalonia for providing our villa Mas Gorral near Figueres. Charming Villas specialise in luxury and character villas in Catalonia from rustic villas in the countryside to modern coastal villas. They have over 80 villas to choose from and as Richard and Sara who run the company are based locally they are able to help with planning your holiday and on hand to sort out any issues.

Mas Gorral has 5 double bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, plenty of living space, a terrace, large garden and swimming pool. You can rent Mas Gorral through Charming Villas with rental rates starting in May at €2500 per week, rising to €3750 per week in high season. As Mas Gorral is in a rural location, we recommend that you hire a car to get around.

Book Mas Gorral through Charming Villas and follow them on Instagram | Facebook | Twitter

Auto Europe car in Costa BravaThanks to Auto Europe for providing our hire car for exploring Costa Brava. Auto Europe work with 20,000 car rental locations in 180 countries in Europe, Asia, Africa, Australia, as well as North and South America.

For more information to plan your holiday in Costa Brava, visit the Costa Brava Tourism Website and the Catalunya Tourism Website.

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Read about the memories we made in our villa stay in Costa Brava

This article is originally published at Heatheronhertravels.com – Read the original article here

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A driving tour of Costa Brava – old town Girona, seaside Cadaques and all the Dalí in between

Ah, Costa Brava – fresh green wheat fields, yellow rapeseed edged with poppies and views over the olive trees to the snow capped Pyrenees in the distance. These are the memories that we brought home from our recent short break, staying in a rustic luxury villa with our hire car to explore a new place each day.

Tour of Costa Brava

Visiting pretty, painted Girona

Our first day was spent in Girona, the regional capital of Costa Brava. I’d visited a couple of times before and was looking forward to showing it to the family. (Read about my last visit to Lloret de Mar) Girona has a similar feel to its big sister Barcelona, but without the crowds of tourists and dare I say a more authentic Catalan flavour (we don’t talk about Spain here). There’s modern shopping if you want it, but I prefer to just wander around the old streets that surround the cathedral, stopping here and there for some people-watching on a café terrace. If you want the postcard shot of Girona, cross the bridge and walk along for a view of the coloured houses that overlook the river.

Visiting Girona in Costa Brava Heatheronhertravels.com

Visiting Girona in Costa Brava

Lunch on the terrace at Konig

Our lunchtime spot was Konig (Carrer dels Calderers, 16), a well placed café below the Basilica de Sant Feliu with a large terrace overlooking the river where we could bask in the sunshine. They serve good quality local dishes, salads and pasta – nothing too gourmet, but tasty and not too expensive if you are feeding a large group of hungry offspring.

Konig for lunch in Girona

Konig for lunch in Girona

Is this the best gelato in the world?

For desert we fancied an ice cream so I led the troops across the river (admiring pretty painted houses), through the Plaça de la Independència and down the small street to find Rocambolesc (Carrer de Santa Clara, 50). Of course, I knew the gelato would be great, since it is run by the Roca brothers of El Celler de Can Roca fame, a.k.a The best restaurant in the world if you believe these highly prized lists.

Rocambolesc ice cream in Girona

Rocambolesc ice cream in Girona

The six flavours of ice cream change with the season and come out of the machine in a piped swirl, Mr Whippy style. If you think that six choices may not be enough, even if they include coconut and violet, just look at the endless selection of toppings! The lady who served us reeled off her topping recommendations in just the same way as they recite the dishes when they serve you in Michelin star restaurants. I knew then that we were on to a good thing.

Casa Moner in Girona Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Casa Moner in Girona

Pastries that ooze with cream at Casa Moner

Right across the street we were tempted into Casa Moner (Carrer de Santa Clara, 45), a local bakery chain that serves artizan breads and pastries. I bought one of their Xuixo signature pastries, a rolly-polly doughnut filled with custard cream, the kind that oozes out the sides and drips down your chin when you take a bite. Beyond the narrow shopfront there was a sizeable cafe area at the back where you could sit to enjoy all the cakes, but sadly that would have to wait for another day.

Fabrica cafe in Girona Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Fabrica cafe in Girona

A trendy cycle cafe at Fabrica

Crossing over the red metal lattice of the Eiffel bridge (made by Gustave Eiffel a few years before he even thought of that tower in Paris) we headed back into the old town, having spotted on the map the old walls that encircle half of Girona. We hoped to find some steps to get up onto the path that leads along the top, but it took a coffee stop at the trendy cycle café, La Fábrica (Carrer de la Llebre, 3) to get directions to the start of the wall.

Walking the walls in Girona Heatheronhertravels.com

Walking the walls in Girona

Walking the walls of Girona

Once up at the top, the path was an easy walk giving us views over the rooftops. We could effortlessly peep into windows below us and snoop on gardens and terraces. The path ran from one end of the old town to the other, with towers along the way where you could climb up for even more expansive views. We walked around 30 minutes to get from one end of the wall to the other and ended up behind the cathedral so I popped in to have a look around.

Majestic Girona Catheral

The cathedral was majestic and tranquil, with towering stone pillars and stained glass lit up by the sun. Photographs were not allowed inside and although many people had their mobile phones out I decided to respect that. Instead I’ll give you a shot of the cathedral cloister which I visited on my way out.

Cathedral cloister in Girona Heatheronhertravels.com

Cathedral cloister in Girona

Staying at Mas Gorral with Charming Villas

I think it’s time to tell you something about our villa which was kindly provided by Charming Villas Catalonia. Set in the countryside a short drive from Figures, we were blown away by Mas Gorral. It’s an old farmhouse that has obviously been added to over the years although all in such authentic style that it’s difficult to tell what is centuries old and what is new.

The villa was set on the hillside so we had views over the countryside towards the snow capped Pyrenees and over the nearby village of Pontos, all terracotta roofs and narrow streets that you could just about get a car through.

At our villa Mas Gorral through Charming Villas Catalonia heatheronhertravels.com

At our villa Mas Gorral through Charming Villas Catalonia

Inside we had 5 spacious bedrooms with 3 bathrooms between us and a huge dining room and living room that featured natural stonework, colourful walls and antique furnishings. Local painted pottery mixed with Asian pieces, perhaps inspired by the owner’s travels. With quirky artworks, well kept gardens and a (bracingly fresh) pool this was the perfect place for our two families to share.

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At our villa Mas Gorral through Charming Villas Catalonia Heatheronhertravels.com

At our villa Mas Gorral through Charming Villas Catalonia

The Dali Theatre-Museum at Figueres

When in Costa Brava there’s no escaping that giant of 20th Century art, Salvador Dalí who was born just down the road from our villa at Figures. As we drove the hire car into town and circled to find parking I have to admit that Figueres looked unremarkable. We walked towards the red towers topped with white eggs of the museum and luckily got inside just before waves of French school children began to arrive.

Dali Museum in Figueres heatheronhertravels.com

Dali Museum in Figueres

The museum was created over 10 years in the old municipal theatre and was Dali’s personal project.  He called in his artworks from all over the world and added art installations specially for the museum.

Dali Museum in Figueres heatheronhertravels.com

Dali Museum in Figueres

Entering the first couryard that would have been the theatre auditorium we found the Rainy Cadillac topped with a huge breasted and bellied goddess figure. Gold statues like Oscar awards looked down from the walls and a fishing boat was stranded at the top of a column of Michelin tyres – I saw those again at Dali’s house in Port Lligat. On the stage was another artwork the size of a cinema screen and in the niche to one side a nude figure of Dali’s wife Gala with her back turned – except when you cross your eyes or look at it through your camera you realise that it’s a portrait of Abraham Lincoln.

Dali Museum in Figueres heatheronhertravels.com

Dali Museum in Figueres

The whole museum was packed full of artworks with that feeling of ‘it’s not quite what it seems’. I did buy the guidebook but didn’t read it until afterwards so it was an enjoyable game to just wander through the rooms, absorbing the impression without overthinking the meaning. At the end of the day it seems to be a projection of Dali’s rich subconsciousness and dreamworld.

Dali Museum in Figueres heatheronhertravels.com

The Wind Palace Room at the Dali Museum in Figueres

Once you have left the main museum, there is the jewellery collection which is included in the same entrance ticket, full of most gorgeous bling. I coveted the ruby lips with pearl teeth and the red ruby heart brooch that has a mechanism inside so it literally beats.

Gala’s Castle at Pubol

After the Dali museum we decided there wasn’t an awful lot more to see in Figueres so we drove back to the villa where the rest of the crew decided to have a relaxing afternoon. Guy and I (OK it was mainly me) wanted a bit more of the Dali fix and so we drove south towards Girona to visit the Castle at Púbol that Dali gave to his wife Gala. It really was a beautiful drive on country roads with little traffic and only the occasional mishap when we inadvertantly drove through one of those old villages where the houses close in and the lanes became so narrow that you worry for your wing mirrors.

Gala Dalí Castle House-Museum in Púbol Heatheronhertravels.com

Gala Dalí Castle House-Museum in Púbol

This fortified country house or castel was a gift that Dali had promised Gala years before, a place that she could come on her own and relax, where even her husband would have to request written permission to visit her (or so the story goes). Once the museum at Figures was nearly complete the couple were able to start work on the renovations for their new project which was designed to suit Gala’s taste with some of Dali’s surreal art such as the cupboard painted with radiators to disguise the real radiators.

Gala Dalí Castle House-Museum in Púbol Heatheronhertravels.com

Gala Dalí Castle House-Museum in Púbol

The decoration here was luxurious but the overall effect simpler than the house we would see the next day at Port Lligat where the same amount of furniture was squashed into half the space. This was much more Gala’s retreat where she would come for a few weeks at a time to relax away from all the showmanshop that surrounded her husband.

Gala Dalí Castle House-Museum in Púbol Heatheronhertravels.com

Gala Dalí Castle House-Museum in Púbol

Gala was an clearly an elegant woman, her hair swept back into a girlish style, which was pinned with a large black velvet bow. Since I used to work in fashion, I loved looking at Gala’s dresses on display upstairs from the 50s and 60s, purchased from designers such as Pierre Cardin and Elsa Schiaparelli. Her dresses show her loved colour, luxurious fabrics and the subtle sparkle of lurex.

Driving tips for Costa Brava with Auto Europe

If you are staying in a villa as we were and want to see something of Costa Brava, you really need a hire car and ours was kindly provided by Auto Europe. The pickup and drop off at Girona airport was painless and we found that the roads easy to navigate, with much less traffic than we are used to in the overcrowded UK. It really made the driving a pleasure to pass fields full of wildflowers and yellow rapeseed edged with poppies. Of course in the high summer by the coast it might get a bit crazy, but away from the coast I suspect that even in high season these country roads are an easy drive.

Our hire car through Auto Europe Heatheronhertravels.com

Our hire car through Auto Europe

The only thing I would advise with a hire car is to avoid the centre of older towns and village centres that were not really made for cars. In Girona or Cadaques, we found that when you get close to the centre it’s best to park in the first public car park you see and walk into the old centre. Beware also of the small country villages which normally have a route that goes around them as well as a road that goes through them. The streets can be incredibly narrow, as we found out accidentally on a couple of occasions, so drive around if you can. You can check out my driving tips for Costa Brava in the video below.

The wild Costa Brava at Cadaques

Our final day was blessed with glorious sunshine at Cadaques, an old fishing town that’s now quite a tourist hotspot on the wild and rocky Cap de Creus. You drive on a winding road that snakes up through the unspoiled natural park, and brings you down the other side to Cadaques.

Cadaques in Costa Brava Heatheronhertravels.com

Cadaques in Costa Brava

Parking the hire car in the first main car park we saw as we came into town was the right decision as there was little space to pass in the smaller roads close to the beach. We walked around the seafront away from the busiest terrace restaurants and cafes and found a smaller place that had been recommended to me called Enoteca MF. It’s the wine bar and tapas restaurant that’s run by the same family that has a vineyard and winery set above Cadaques called Sa Perafita which you pass on the way into town.

Lunch at Sa Enoteca in Cadaques in Costa Brava Heatheronhertravels.com

Lunch at Sa Enoteca in Cadaques in Costa Brava

They serve fabulous tapas with the seafood being especially fresh and delicious. We tried a bit of everything including a bottle or two of their Cava and a glass of the local Vermouth which is the fashionable drink of the moment in Catalunya. There was the pan tomat rubbed with tomato and garlic, a plate of local cheeses, red tuna sashimi and a salmon tartare topped with guacamole. We were impressed to see the staff peeling a huge bowl of pink shrimps which were then pulverised to make a shrimp carpaccio. It was enough to melt the heart of the most avid opponent of raw fish.

Port Lligat in Costa Brava Heatheronhertravels.com

Port Lligat in Costa Brava

After lunch we walked up the lane beside the wine bar and in 10 minutes were overlooking the next bay at Port Lligat, a small fishing bay where Dali spent most of the time with his wife Gala. The house was created by knocking together a number of fishing huts and then extending them over the years. Because the individual rooms are so small you need to book timed tickets in advance (in April we were able to get them the day before).

Dali House at Port Lligat Heatheronhertravels.com

Dali House at Port Lligat

Although there were not many large scale artworks here, Dali’s vision was felt everywhere although the dried yellow ‘everlasting’ flowers were in almost every room, a favourite of Gala’s. Dali’s art studio was one of the largest spaces with light flooding in and an easel that could be moved up and down so that Dali could always paint sitting down on his chair.

Dali House at Port Lligat Heatheronhertravels.com

Dali House at Port Lligat

We moved from room to room, up a few steps each time since the different cottages were on different levels and emerged on a lovely terrace, with whitewashed stonework, pots of flowering plants and olive trees providing shade. The surprise was that they’d cleverly fitted in a swimming pool on the terrace with a round section and narrow channel for swimming up and down.

Dali House at Port Lligat Heatheronhertravels.com

Dali House at Port Lligat

Since not all of our group had visited the Dali house, we joined the rest enjoying a drink at the Es Raco d’en Dani Xiringuito at the other end of the beach – another offshoot of the Sa Perafita winery. There was plenty of seafood on the menu and although we stuck to the beers and coffee the waft of grilled octopus was mouthwatering.

Cadaques in Costa Brava Heatheronhertravels.com

Cadaques in Costa Brava

Rather reluctantly we walked back over the headland to Cadaques and wandered around the artisan market where we bought olive bread and pastries from the Cas Mona stand that we had seen in Girona.

Market near Pontas in Costa Brava Heatheronhertravels.com

Market near Pontas in Costa Brava

What a fabulous break we’d had but the next day it was time to return to Girona airport for our flight home. Still we managed a quick trip to the Sunday market at nearby Bascara to buy some salad and rotisserie chicken for lunch on the terrace.

As we basked in the warm sun I think we were all trying to soak it up and take a little piece of Costa Brava sunshine home with us.

Costa Brava countryside Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

The countryside near our villa in Costa Brava

Have you been to Costa Brava or Catalunya and if so, what did you enjoy?

Read more about Costa Brava

Lloret de Mar – sun, sea and so much more…
Val de Nuria – a Sunday stroll in the Pyrenees
Staying in the heart of old town Girona

Visitor Information for Costa Brava

Thanks to Charming Villas Catalonia for providing our villa Mas Gorral near Figueres. Charming Villas specialise in luxury and character villas in Catalonia from rustic villas in the countryside to modern coastal villas. They have over 80 villas to choose from and as Richard and his wife who run the company are based locally they are able to help with planning your holiday and on hand to sort out any issues.

Thanks to Auto Europe for providing our hire car for exploring Costa Brava. Auto Europe work with 20,000 car rental locations in 180 countries in Europe, Asia, Africa, Australia, as well as North and South America.

For more information to plan your holiday in Costa Brava, visit the Costa Brava Tourism Website and the Catalunya Tourism Website.

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Read about our driving tour of Costa Brava

This article is originally published at Heatheronhertravels.com – Read the original article here

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