Six of the best coffees around the world

Are you a coffee lover like me? It’s the aroma of freshly ground coffee beans that hits your nose first and then you take a sip of hot, sweet coffee. Ahhh, the day starts to feel better already. But perhaps for you it’s a tiny cup of strong, black expresso, ending the meal perfectly like a full stop at the end of a sentence. Or a frothy cappuccino to eat with a sweet pastry for breakfast like they do in Spain.

6 of the best coffees around the world

However you like it, a great cup of coffee is full of ritual as you watch a skilled barista operate those shiny machines that woosh and hiss, or the buzzy atmosphere of your favourite coffee shop where you meet your friends for a late morning weekend brunch or an afternoon coffee and cake.

Now I’m dreaming about all the coffees I’ve enjoyed on my travels, each coffee experience giving me a doorway into the culture of the place I visited. For more coffee inspiration, take a look at this Coffee infographic that will take you around the world in 31 coffees, but in the meantime let me share with you some of my favourite coffees around the world.

1. Copenhagen – the best coffee in the world?

If ever there was a place where they know how to elevate coffee to an art form it is Copenhagen and Coffee Collective sits among the best of the best.

Coffee Collective in Copenhagen Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Coffee Collective in Copenhagen

I visited their original coffee shop in Nørrebro a few years ago, a tiny place with just a few wooden tables outside and a stool inside to perch while your coffee is being expertly made. Their coffee beans are sold all around Copenhagen and they operate on a Direct Trade model, working with farmers in Brazil, Guatamala, Kenya and Panama to pay the best prices for the best quality coffee. If you visit this place you’ll probably be buying your coffee to take away (perhaps picking up a pastry from the Claus Meyer bakery across the road) but if you want to sit and enjoy your coffee in a foodie atmosphere, head for their stand in the Torvehallerne food market halls.

Coffee Cooperative in Copenhagen Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Coffee Cooperative in Copenhagen

Torvehallerne is one of my favourite places in Copenhagen, where you can get a fabulous but reasonably priced lunch or sip your coffee with a cake just like your Danish grandmother might have baked. The third branch of Coffee Collective is in Frederiksberg, where the beans are roasted and they do monthly tours and coffee tastings where you can learn how to make a perfect coffee. Definitely a place of pilgrimage for the coffee connoisseur.

Read More: Eat the Neighbourhood in Norrebro, Copenhagen

2. Coffee time is Fika time in Sweden

If you’ve visited Sweden I’m sure you’ll have come across the tradition of ‘fika’, or having a coffee break with friends. This is the occasion to settle down in a cosy cafe where the counters are laden with buns and pastries to relax over a good cup of coffee and a chat. When I visited Gothenburg I discovered that the picturesque old neighbourhood of Haga was the perfect fika spot, since its cobbled streets are lined with cafes, restaurants and artizan shops.

Buns at Cafe Kringlan in Haga, Gothenburg, Sweden Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Buns at Cafe Kringlan in Haga, Gothenburg, Sweden

Cafe Husaren on the corner of the main street of Hada Nygatan is reputed to be the original source of the enormous cinamon buns which are a speciality of Gothenburg, although we squeezed into the pretty, traditional Cafe Kringlan with the gold bagel hanging outside. The local’s choice for fika in Gothenburg seems to be Da Matteo and they have several shops including the largest in Magasingaten where they bake the bread and pastries on the premises, so you get the aroma of freshly baked bread thrown in with your coffee.

Read More: Favourite coffee spots in Gothenburg for your coffee fix

3. Salzburg – for coffee and cakes

Perhaps you’ve gathered by now that I have something of a sweet tooth, so heaven for me is a great cup of coffee served in the afternoon with a slice of the local cake. Of course Austria makes a speciality of this Kaffee und Kuchen ritual and where better than Salzburg, the glorious homeland of Mozart and the Sound of Music to enjoy it?

Steinterrasse in Salzburg Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Steinterrasse in Salzburg

When it comes to cake to accompany your afternoon coffee, you’ll likely be wavering between the Apfelstrudel (soft bites of apple wrapped in crisp layers of pastry) and the Sacher Torte (rich, dense chocolate cake laced with apricot jam). The traditional choice would probably be to head for Hotel Sacher which overlooks the river but we enjoyed our kaffee und kuchen on the rooftop terrace of the Hotel Stein with a fabulous view of the fortress, which is highly recommended in good weather. 

Read more: Bratwurst and Sacher Torte – or what we ate in Salzburg

4. A chilled frappe on the beach in Greece

Coffee can be a cool drink in more ways than one, as I discovered on my annual trips to Greece to visit my sister who lives on the Greek Island of Zakynthos. Traditionally the Greeks drink their coffee like the Turks, strong and sweet in a tiny cup together with those ultra-sweet pastries that drip with syrup. This is what you’d serve to friends who come visiting in the afternoon.

Frappuccino on Ionian beach, Zakynthos, Greece Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Frappuccino on Ionian beach, Zakynthos, Greece

But the trendy thing to drink in summer is a chilled Frappé – where an expresso is poured over ice with creamy milk to make a coffee that’s sipped through a straw from a long glass. When you’re lying on your sunbed or sitting in a trendy Greek beach bar, be sure to order a “Freddo” coffee, which comes in different Italian styles such as a Freddo cappuccino, Freddo Expresso or a Freddoccino (iced mocha coffee with chocolate). 

Read More: Sunday morning Greek coffee and Glika in Zakynthos

5. Ruddesheimer coffee in Germany – coffee with a creamy kick

If you fancy your coffee with something a little stronger, we found the perfect alternative coffee on our Rhine River Cruise stop at the pretty town of Rudesheim. Wandering down the cobbled street of the Drosselgasse with its wine shops and taverns we stopped at Rudesheimer Schloss to try the local speciality of Rudesheimer coffee.

Rudesheimer coffee Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Rudesheimer coffee

This coffee spiked with brandy is the German equivalent of Irish Coffee and started in the 1920s when the Alspach brandy company invented a brandy chocolate so that ladies could enjoy a secret tipple, at a time when it was considered unseemly for women to drink in public. One good thing lead to another and in the 1950s the Rudesheimer coffee was born, a warming mixture of sweet coffee with a good helping of Asbach brandy, topped with sweet, whipped vanilla cream and sprinkled with grated chocolate. These days the Rudesheimer coffee is served in all the local coffee shops and you can bring back small bottles of the Alspach brandy if you want to try it at home.

Read More: How to make a Rudesheimer coffee – video

6. A hot chocolate alternative to coffee in Gothenburg

If you’re not a coffee drinker, you’ll be pleased to know that in Gothenburg we found an excellent alternative at Cafe Kanold that specialises in velvety hot chocolate. Staying cosy from the chilly wind and weather, we sat on the cushioned banquette with pretty floral cushions and enjoyed a warming hot chocolate – served with chili flakes on top for an extra kick.

Cafe Kanold in Gothenburg, Sweden Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Cafe Kanold in Gothenburg, Sweden

While there is also a counter of hand-made Kanold chocolates in the cafe, you’ll want to visit the main Kanold chocolate shop close by on Södra Larmgatan at the end of Viktoriapassagen. It’s a cross between an old fashioned candy store and a boutique chocolatier where you can buy the Kanold speciality, a soft chocolate truffle centre topped with sea salt, which has now become known as the “Gothenburg Truffle”. Of course if you insist of coffee at Cafe Kanold, I’m sure they serve that too!

Read More: Chocolate with sea salt – a taste of West Sweden

Check out this Coffee Infographic

If you want to fuel your coffee fascination even more, take a look at this Coffee infographic from  Cheapflights that will take you around the world in 31 coffees. Here are a few cool coffee facts that I discovered;

  • In Italy you only drink milky coffee in the morning and NEVER after a meal – the cappuccino in the afternoon is only for tourists!
  • Breakfast in Spain normally consists of a cup of coffee with a sweet pastry or churros
  • In Senegal coffee is served with cloves and guinea pepper
  • In 2001 Brazil issued a coffee scented postage stamp
  • Seatle has 10 times more coffee store per head than the rest of the USA
Around the world in 31 Coffees Photo: Cheapflights.com

Around the world in 31 Coffees – infographic from Cheapflights

Now, please excuse me as I’m off to find the perfect coffee to have with my weekend brunch in Bristol

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6 of the best coffees around the world

This article is originally published at Heatheronhertravels.com – Read the original article here

This article is written in association with Cheapflights

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Where Heather travelled in 2014

As we see out the old year and bring in the new, there’s something of a tradition in blogging circles to review the places you visited, share photos from the year just gone and generally reminisce about those days of sunshine and happy memories – doesn’t everything seem more rosy in retrospect?

Looking back over my travelling year, I’m amazed at how many places in the UK and Europe I managed to fit in, considering that I have a full-time job and family (although only one of my little birds left in the nest). Perhaps that’s why my preferred travel style is the short break, to pack in the maximum fun from a limited amount of holiday. My most regular travel companion is my husband Guy who by his own admission is as expert in ‘loafing’ as I am at scribbling, photographing, video-ing, although he regularly gets roped in as assistant cameraman and videographer. Whenever I get the chance, I also love travelling with friends and family, especially when the (nearly-grown-up) kids do us the honour of coming along.

So here is a taste of my travelling year in 2014 in anticipation of many more happy travels in 2015.

January: Still recovering from Paris in December

Christmas market at Notre Dame in Paris Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Christmas market at Notre Dame in Paris

January was something of a catch-up month, so I’m cheating a little bit here by including the pre-Christmas trip to Paris from December 2013. We found that Paris at Christmas is surprisingly un-Christmassy as the French are pretty low key about their celebrations and decorations. On this trip we stayed clear of the regular tourist traps (although we couldn’t quite escape Notre Dame) and enjoyed exploring the more local haunts, with a gourmet walking tour of Marche D’Aligre, a local dining experience with a Frenche Creole flavour and a walk along the pretty Canal Saint Martin in Bastille.

Read More: Our winter weekend in Paris, the food, the sights, the video

February: A winter break in Copenhagen for the Wondercool festival

The picturesque harbour at Nyhaven, Copenhagen Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

The picturesque harbour at Nyhaven, Copenhagen

In February we were back in Copenhagen, a favourite of mine, to see what the city has to offer in winter and check out the Copenhagen Cooking festival. The gastronomic highlight was a gastro-cruise around the harbour during which we stopped at no less than six of the top restaurants in Copenhagen, each of which had prepared a different dish of mussels. I hadn’t quite realised that the focus would be entirely on one ingredient so was quite thankful that both Guy and I love seafood! We stayed at the fabulous and colourful Anderson boutique hotel and managed to combine more gourmet food tasting at the Torverhallerne food market with culture at Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek and Rosenborg Slot.

Read More: In Photos: Our weekend break in Copenhagen

March:  Heather is featured in Woman and Home Magazine

Heather is featured in Woman and Home magazine Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Heather is featured in Woman and Home magazine

Although this is not actually a place I travelled but I have to mention how thrilled I was at being featured in Woman and Home magazine, with two other bloggers in a feature about “Blogging for fame and fortune”. I had such a fun day at the photography shoot, being made up and dressed up in impossibly high heels with tons of make-up, and a suitcase that would never have made it past the Ryanair police. All great fantasy and left me floating on air when friends kept telling me they had seen me in the magazine.

Read More: Blogging for fame and fortune? Heather is featured in Woman and Home magazine

March: A weekend in Marrakech in search of Josephine Baker

Trying an orange juice in Jemaa el Fnaa, Marrakech Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Trying an orange juice in Jemaa el Fnaa, Marrakech

March took me off to Marrakech to get my fix of spring sunshine and we stayed in the magical Riad Star which was once the home of French cabaret artist and superstar of the 1920s, Josephine Baker. The Riad has been beautifully renovated in a Jazz Age theme, with a relaxing roof terrace, inner courtyard where we enjoyed breakfast and even had its own dressing up box. We spent the weekend trying to not get too lost in the Souk, perfecting our haggling skills, and visiting a fair number of beautifully decorated mosques, palaces and gardens. Of course there was the obligatory snake charmer photo opportunity in Jemaa el Fnaa.

Read More: Marrakech – on shopping, sightseeing and (not) getting lost in the souk

 April: A spring break in North Devon

Primroses in North Devon Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Primroses in North Devon

April is when spring is truly upon us with the daffodils and primroses blooming in North Devon. We spent a weekend with friends in the lush, green wilds of the Devon countryside at Penhaven Country Cottages, booked through Premier Cottages. There was plenty of pub grub, coastal walks and a visit to Clovelly, the picturesque cliffside village that is now a major tourist attraction and could easily play a starring role in any costume drama about smugglers and pirates.

Read More: Primroses and daffodils – a spring break in North Devon with Premier Cottages

May: Walking the Pembrokeshire coastal path and the puffins on Skomer island

Puffins on Skomer Island Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Puffins on Skomer Island

In May we went walking in Wales along the Pembrokeshire coastal path with Macs Adventure on a taster version of their Best of Pembrokeshire itinerary. We had chosen the perfect time of year to visit Skomer island, a short boat ride off the coast, since it was the beginning of the Puffin breeding season and we were able to get really close to the cute looking Puffins as they arrived back at their burrows. Our walk along the Pembrokeshire coastal path continued from Broadhaven, past the lovely harbour at Solva, ending at St David’s where we had a look around the famous cathedral, art galleries and craftshops in the “Smallest City in Great Britain”, which is really an overgrown village.

Read More: A long day’s walk on the Pembrokeshire coastal path – Broadhaven to St David’s

May: A Mediterranean Cruise with MSC Cruises

MSC Splendida at Tunis Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

MSC Splendida at Tunis

Later in May we were off again on a Mediterranean cruise with MSC Cruises. We embarked at Barcelona and had a fun week as the ship cruised around the Med visiting Marseille, Genoa, Naples, Messina and Tunis, before returning to Barcelona. The ship was very glamorous with a lively atmosphere and plenty of families on board, and at each port we visited I wished we could have stayed just a little longer!

Read More: Cruising the Mediterranean on MSC Splendida? Here’s what you need to know

June: Discovering Dylan Thomas in Swansea and Laugharne

With the Dylan Thomas statue in Swansea Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

With the Dylan Thomas statue in Swansea

One of my favourite UK trips this year was to South Wales to discover more about the poet, Dylan Thomas in his centenary year. Swansea, where Dylan grew up, is not the prettiest of cities but provided a fascinating gateway to his childhood and early years. We followed his life through the dramatised walk we took around the streets from the Dylan Thomas Centre and our visit to the Dylan Thomas Birthplace at 5 Cwmdonkin Drive. Our Dylan Thomas discovery continued at Laugharne in Carmarthenshire, where we stayed at Dylan’s favourite drinking haunt of Brown’s Hotel and visited The Boat House where he lived and worked, overlooking the beautiful Taf estuary. With views like these who wouldn’t be inspired?

Read More: An ugly, lovely town Part 1 – a Return Journey to Swansea with Dylan Thomas

June: Walking the beaches of the Gower in South Wales

Caswell Bay on the Gower Peninsula, South Wales Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Caswell Bay on the Gower Peninsula, South Wales

In June, I was back in Wales with another cottage stay at the fabulous luxury cottage, Promenade View in Mumbles through Home from Home Cottages. The cottage was perfectly situated on the promenade of this traditional holiday resort which is also the gateway to the fabulous beaches of the Gower Peninsula. We took full advantage, with a long walk from our front door along the coastal path, past the fabulous beaches of Bracelet Bay, Langland, Caswell, along the clifftop to Pennard, where we caught the bus back to Mumbles. The next day we had a morning in the sand-dunes and flat beach of Llangenith, a favourite beach for surfers which left us feeling refreshed and miles from our busy life in Bristol.

Read More: Walking the beaches of the Gower and our luxury Mumbles Cottage

July: Back to Copenhagen for a family holiday

With our bikes, by the harbour in Copenhagen Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

With our bikes, by the harbour in Copenhagen

Two visits to the same place in one year must mean that I really like a place and we took the family back to Copenhagen in late July for a family break, staying in a large apartment near the harbour side. The weather was hot and sunny and we cycled everywhere, swam in the harbour, ate great street-food and took ferries across the harbour. Like Copenhageners of all ages, we enjoyed a day at Tivoli, although after the adrenalin rush of the roller-coaster with my kids I was happy to sit and admire the rose garden from a shady spot on the lawn.

Read More: 10 summertime cool things we did in Copenhagen (and you could too)

August: Zakynthos Greece for a beach holiday with my daughter

On Dafni beach in Zakynthos, Greece Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

On Dafni beach in Zakynthos, Greece

Since my sister lives on the Greek island of Zakynthos, I try to visit her each year and in August I was there with my 19 year old daughter and English niece. Since my Greek niece was also there with four of her friends, I got to hang out with the beach-babes in the most trendy beach bars, check out all the unspoiled beaches and generally live the life of a 19 year old on holiday. When not sipping on my chilled frappe coffee or swimming in the clear water to cool off, I was able to observe Greek beach style and etiquette which I wrote about in the article below.

Read More: Six things the English girls get So wrong on the beach in Greece!

September: A foodie adventure in South Tyrol, Italy

In the Dolomites on the Via Ferrata in South Tyrol Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

In the Dolomites on the Via Ferrata in South Tyrol

September took me to South Tyrol in Italy, an area that is close to the Austrian and Swiss borders with stunning mountain scenery in the Dolomites. I spent a few days there, combining outdoor activities with gastronomic pleasures, cycling around Lake Kaltern on the South Tyrol wine road, visiting some of the local designers and the climbing a Via Ferrata. These ‘iron routes’ are rock climbing routes of varying difficulty where you are secured to a cable that snakes up the rock-face, enabling relative novices like me to reach the top (although best with a guide) in a scary but exhilarating experience.

Read More: Climbing my very first Via Ferrata in South Tyrol

 September: Hiking the Dry Stone route in Mallorca

Heather and Julia wlaking the dry stone route in Mallorca Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Heather and Julia wlaking the dry stone route in Mallorca

Later in September I was off for another walking holiday with my friend Julia, to Mallorca. Having completed the Tour de Mont Blanc together in previous years, we fancied something that combined views of the sea with mountainous walking and decided to walk a section of the Dry Stone Route, a long-distance path that skirts the west coast of Mallorca into the Tramuntana mountain range. We passed through several of the coastal resorts of Mallorca but my favourite time was walking the higher rocky sections of the Traamuntana from Soller to Lluc monastery.

Read More: Hiking the Dry Stone route in Mallorca from Deia to Lluc monastery

October: Athens for TBEX Blogger’s Conference

Heather at the Parthenon in Athens Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Heather at the Parthenon in Athens

In October I was in Athens, a city I haven’t really explored, despite visiting the Greek islands every year to see my sister. The city has been through a tough time with the recent ecenomic crisis but we found a new spirit of optimism and purpose as the worst seems to be over. The city was hosting the TBEX blogger’s conference and as part of this I spent a day in Athens on a gastronomic walking tour as well as a visit to the Parthenon. I was pleasantly surprised the warmth and spirit of Athens and it’s one place I’d love to get back to see more of in 2015.

Read More: Athens is on the menu for 2015 – a taste of Greece at TBEX

November: A weekend at the Moorland Garden Hotel in Devon

Moorland Garden Hotel in Devon

Moorland Garden Hotel in Devon

In November I was back down to Devon for a weekend on the edge of Dartmoor at the Moorland Garden Hotel. This is a part of the world that I have visited quite a few times and we visited the market town of Tavistock, on the edge of the moor and visited The Garden House and National Trust property of Buckland Abbey nearby. There were all too many opportunities to try those yummy Devon cream teas.

Read More: Our weekend break at the Moorland Garden Hotel in Devon

December: A pre-Christmas weekend in Dublin

Bewleys in Dublin at Christmas Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Bewleys in Dublin at Christmas

To bring the year to a close I spent a weekend in Dublin with my husband and 17 year old son in early December. The purpose of our trip was the Trinity College open day, since my son is looking at university choices for next year, but we managed to pack in an awful lot else, with shopping on Grafton Street, the Little Museum of Dublin and plenty of great meals, not to mention the odd pint of Guinness.

Read More: 10 things to do on a Christmas weekend in Dublin

So the year comes to a close but I know there will be plenty more travel adventures in 2015. In January I will be back down to Devon to stay in another lovely cottage that’s close to the Jurassic coast, as well as a visit to India at the end of the month to visit the charity project that I support in Andhra Pradesh. I hope that you’ll join me through the blog on these and other trips and follow my photos on social media too.

Wishing you many happy travel adventures of your own in 2015.

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The adventures of an Englishman and a Sogreni bicycle in Copenhagen

December 27, 2014 by  
Filed under Copenhagen, Denmark, featured

In this guest article, my husband Guy shares the story of his holiday romance with a Sogreni bicycle in Copenhagen this summer and how he returned there in December to bring his new bike home.

“That man is the richest whose pleasures are the cheapest”, wrote the American philosopher, Henry David Thoreau, a thought that could be written for those of us who have always been excited by cycling as a combination of transport, adventure and cutting edge design. Let us enter the rarified world of Sogreni bicycles in Copenhagen, where the artist’s materials are steel, brass and leather and where the wait for your new hand-built bicycle is part of the pleasure.

Guy with his new Sogreni Bicycle in Copenhagen Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Guy with his new Sogreni Bicycle in Copenhagen

The week before Christmas, I found myself catching planes, trains and automobiles to Copenhagen, Denmark, to collect my bespoke Sogreni Young Shatterhand bicycle, a mere six months after my fitting with Soren Sogreni in his eclectic shop on Sankt Peders Stræde.

As everyone knows Copenhagen is truly a green city surrounded by water and parks, with climate-friendly citizens to match. Holding the title of European Green Capital of 2014, the city is not resting on its green credentials, but aims to become the world’s first CO2 neutral capital by 2025. In Copenhagen, sustainability and cycling are an integral part of the vibe and there is even a Cycling Embassy that advises the world on how cycling can be integrated into daily life.

Bikes are simply everywhere and used by all ages from the Royal Family downwards. Indeed Crown Prince Frederik is the only Royal to have completed an ironman triathlon, consisting of a 2.4-mile swim, a 112-mile bicycle ride and a 26.2-mile marathon, raced without a break. Useful but not essential preparation for taking one of the children out in a Christiana type cargo bike – a three wheeled design that can be configured in many combinations and is as popular with families as it is for delivering the post.

Christiania Bikes in Copenhagen Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Christiania Bikes in Copenhagen

Having been to Copenhagen many times it was not long before I became aware of Soren Sogreni and his bicycles. Like a moth drawn to a candle I finally tracked him down to his shop when on holiday this August, finding myself chatting about engineering and Classic British cars and particularly the Bristol marque.  I immediately liked him as haute couture is not my thing and Soren is well known for his  T-shirt-and-shorts appearance. I had done my research and knew exactly what I wanted so the ordering process took very little time and soon I was back at our apartment dizzy with the caffine overload and the excitment of my purchase. 

The months of waiting for my bike to be made was not a problem, indeed it was part of the excitement, given the time invested in deciding on the type and specification of the bicycle. A Sogreni hand-built bicycle is not something to be rushed or to rush on in an unseemly and sweaty manner. Like a Bentley motor car there is speed enough, but such a vehicle is not about writing or graphics and there certainly won’t be any lycra or writing on this rider.

If anything the delay helped me appreciate the skill and workmanship that went into the creation of this new and custom built machine. My new bicycle was the result of numerous manufacturing processes and logistics involving craftsmen from across Europe but with life, character and soul breathed into it by the Sogreni magician and mechanic, Peter, who I met on my return visit to the workshop in Copenhagen.

The Sogreni Bike shop in Copenhagen Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

The Sogreni Bike shop in Copenhagen

This Sogreni design is a build of distinction and rightly recognised by the luxury Danish brand, Georg Jensen who commissioned twenty identical bikes from Sogreni. The internationally renowned Louisiana Museum of Modern Art to the north of Copenhagen for many years displayed another Sogreni classic bicycle design, named the Louisiana, which you can still order.

So how did my bicycle get its name of Young Shatterhand? As Soren Sogreni explained to me, Old Shatterhand is a fictional character in the Western novels of German writer Karl May (1842–1912). He is the German friend and blood brother of Winnetou, the fictional chief of the Mescalero tribe of the Apache, a story that was made into a Euro-western of the same name in 1964, starring Lex Barker. The story of Old shatterhand entertained  Soren Sogreni as a youngster so he decided to name not one but two bicycles after this fictional character. They are the Old Shatterhand and Young Shatterhand. Quirky? You bet!

In Copenhagen you are as likely to see a very stylish lady or gent in the latest fashions riding their Sogreni bicycle through the Latin quarter as a mum cycling with her children in the ‘burbs. Being Copenhagen there is even a Cycle Chic website with an eclectic view on cycling and cyclists that promises to be lycra and granola free and promotes, amongst other things, the slow cycling movement. It also shows the amount of kilometres cycled by Copenhageners today. Incredible and for all you UK cyclists NOBODY jumps red lights … There really is no need people!

Bicycles are everywhere on the streets of Copenhagen Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Bicycles are everywhere on the streets of Copenhagen

For visitors and residents alike, Copenhagen has recently introduced the Bycyklen smart bike for hire, which you will see in numerous public places around the city. It represents the latest generation of urban electric bikes, with no-puncture tyres, built in lights, touchscreen computing and GPS navigation, all in a stylish and durable design. Once you have set up your account, you can pay by the hour or have a monthly account and the web site will tell you how many bikes are available at the nearest docking station. Now how cool is that?

Peter from Sogreni and Guy with his new bike packaged up for the airport Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Peter from Sogreni and Guy with his new bike packaged up for the airport

So back to my journey to collect my Sogreni bicycle. While some might ask why a bespoke bicycle is necessary I am hoping that my hand built machine will transform the everyday journey to work into a joyful progression. My Young Shatterhand includes leather handles, a carrying rack, an enclosed gearbox, a drum brake for the front wheel and painted rimmed mountain bike wheels – as well as a magestic brown leather sprung Brooks saddle. A bike beautifully designed by Soren Sogreni and lovingly constructed and fitted to me by Peter just in time for Christmas.

This is a bike that has kept me awake at nights, a bike I think is perfect for my today and my tomorrow and a bike that I will never sell. I believe that Henry David Thoreau would have approved.

If you go: Sogreni Bicycles, Sankt Peders Stræde 30A, 1453 Copenhagen K, Denmark. You can try out a Sogreni bike on the summer bike tours run by CPHMade – read about it on the Sogreni blog here.

Young Shatterhand Sogreni bicycle makes it home in time for Christmas Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Young Shatterhand Sogreni bicycle makes it home in time for Christmas

More things to see in Copenhagen

10 summertime cool things to do in Copenhagen
A celebration of mussels – our gastro-cruise with Copenhagen Cooking
 Bike + Train = adventure in Copenhagen

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