Coburg: Victoria and Albert’s romantic retreat in Germany

When the 20 year old Queen Victoria of England married her cousin, Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, they must have seemed the dream couple of their age. The young German prince from Coburg turned out to be a loyal husband and their marriage was a happy one, producing nine children. When we visited Albert’s birthplace in Coburg I could understand why he felt so homesick for the rolling countryside and forests of his native Germany and how Victoria shared his love of Coburg, writing “it is a feeling as if I had spent my youth here.”

Coburg Victoria and Albert's Romantic Retreat

Victoria and Albert had been introduced by their Uncle Leopald with a view to making a suitable match for the future Queen of England. Victoria’s mother Victoire and Albert’s father Ernst were brother and sister, and the marriage of cousins was common in the royal families of Europe – keeping power and wealth in the family. Once Uncle Leopald became the first King of the Belgians, he used his influence to secure advantageous marriages for his nephews and nieces, including Victoria and Albert, resulting in his nickname ‘The uncle of Europe’. It was joked that while others built empires through war, the Coburgs did so through marriage.

Schloss Rosenau in Coburg Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Schloss Rosenau in Coburg

Albert’s birthplace at Schloss Rosenau

A few years after their marriage, the royal couple made their first trip to Coburg where Albert was able to take his wife to Schloss Rosenau, the childhood home he felt so nostalgic for. Just as Victoria and Albert must have done, we entered the park along a drive lined with chestnut trees, glimpsing the castle on the hill through a gap in the trees. It’s easy to see why they would have both loved spending time here, with freedom to ride and walk in the 36 acre park, away from the public gaze and formality of the English court. Perhaps in the elegant and romantic Schloss Rosenau, Victoria could imagine what life might be like as an ordinary wife and mother, writing in her memoirs, “If I were not who I am, this would be my real home.

Schloss Rosenau Photos: http://www.schloesser-coburg.de

Schloss Rosenau Photos: www.schloesser-coburg.de

Albert’s father, Duke Ernst I had remodelled the ruined castle in a style that harked back to its medieval origins, drawing on the romantic tales of the knights of old, with a gilded Marble Hall where balls were held in medieval costume. Prince Albert was born at Schloss Rosenau and it was used by the family as their summer residence, while they spent their winters at Ehrenberg Palace. In the 1940s the castle became an old people’s home and some of the fine decoration was lost but more recently the castle has been restored by the Bavarian state to its original splendour and was re-opened to the public in 1990.

Schloss Rosenau in Coburg Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Schloss Rosenau in Coburg

There are guided tours every hour at the castle and we were lucky enough to have a tour in English – although this would normally need to be requested in advance. The castle is on a very domestic scale and the pretty dressing room and bedroom of Albert’s mother Louise reminded us that she was a young girl of just 16 when she married the 33 year old Duke Ernst. The castle was so small that guests would have to walk through her bedroom, so there was a wooden box placed on top of the mattress to store her clothes from public view. Sadly the marriage ended unhappily due to infidelity and the couple separated and later divorced with Louise dying of cancer aged only 30.

Queens View at Schloss Rosenau Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Queens View at Schloss Rosenau

Schloss Rosenhau must have held poignant memories for Albert of his childhood, and to overcome his homesickness for his homeland, Queen Victoria commissioned a series of watercolour images of the castle interiors, including a view from Albert’s schoolroom over the park. The paintings now reside in the Royal Library at Windsor, but copies are on display at Schloss Rosenau and these were used to guide the restoration of the castle to its original bright colours and furnishings.

Beside the drive through the park is a small tree, planted to mark the ‘Queen’s View’, the spot where Queen Victoria could stop her carriage as she left and have one last look back at her beloved Albert’s birthplace on the hill.

If you go:  Scloss Rosenau website 

Ehrenberg Palace in Coburg

Another palace that holds many connections with European royalty is Ehrenburg, its splendour rather overwhelming the modest town of Coburg. This is where Duke Ernst I and his wife Louise, parents of Albert, spent the winter months, while Schloss Rosenau was more suitable for summer use since the thick stone walls were difficult to heat. When we visited the palace, our tour took us through a series of beautiful rooms, where we could admire the full length portraits of Albert and Victoria at the top of the grand staircase.

Ehrenberg Palace exterior Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Ehrenberg Palace in Coburg

Their grandparents Duke Franz Frederich Anton and Countess Augusta had succeeded from impecunious beginnings in creating a powerful dynasty through their marriage policy. By marrying their children into almost all the royal households of Europe they rose in wealth and influence, and as if to emphaise their success, the portraits of the Coburg extended family hang throughout the palace.

Ehrenberg Palace in Coburg Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Ehrenberg Palace in Coburg

Among the many beautiful rooms, stuffed with chandeliers and tapestries, we admired Duchess Louise’s bedchamber, renovated in vibrant green silk to replace the original faded furnishings. The Hall of Giants, with its ornate wedding cake ceiling, was where in 1863 the Hapsburg Emperor Franz Joseph met Queen Victoria, a convenient location half way between their mutual kingdoms.

Ehrenberg Palace in Coburg Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Ehrenberg Palace in Coburg

Pride of place on the tour is the bedroom where Queen Victoria would stay on her visits, complete with the mahogany panelled water closet that she had installed. Ehrenburg Palace seems to overshadow the small town of Coburg, but then it’s quite understandable that with relations in all the royal households of Europe, the Dukes of Coburg would need somewhere suitably impressive to entertain when they came to visit.

If you go: Ehrenburg Website

Queen Victoria's room at Ehrenberg Palace, Coburg Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Queen Victoria’s room at Ehrenberg Palace, Coburg

Visiting Schloss Callenberg, home of the Coburgs

Our final stop as we followed in the footsteps of Victoria and Albert was Schloss Callenberg, the family home of Prince Andreas, Prince of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha and head of the Coburg family. The castle is filled with beautiful artworks, and antiques but we especially enjoyed the two rooms dedicated to Queen Victoria, Prince Albert and their children.

Victoria and Albert portraits at Callenberg Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Victoria and Albert portraits at Callenberg

The Ducal Art Exhibit displays the portraits of all nine children of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert with information about the ties of family and kinship that the House of Coburg holds to Europe’s ruling nobility. There are many other beautiful collections in the castle, although the large open rooms had more of a museum feel, compared to the domestic scale and character of Schloss Rosenau.

Prince Albert portrait in Callenberg Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Prince Albert portrait in Callenberg

There’s also a German Shooting Museum which is a quirky change from all the portraits and antiques, taking you through the history of archery and shooting as a sport complete with laser firing range for those that want to test their skills.

If you go: Schloss Callenberg Website

Schloss Callenberg in Coburg Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Schloss Callenberg in Coburg

Albert’s statue in Coburg

After Albert’s untimely death in 1861, Queen Victoria commissioned a statue of her beloved husband for his hometown of Coburg. To emphasise his achievements he stands wearing his robes of a Knight of the Order of the Garter and holds the plans for the Crystal Palace in one hand. Originally the statue was planned to stand in Albertsplatz and a whole block of houses was demolished to create an open space.

Albertplatz in Coburg Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Albertplatz in Coburg

However Queen Victoria would not hear of her beloved Albert ending up in the second square of the town and ordered that he should be placed with rightful importance in the main square of Marktplatz. The Queen even visited the town in 1865 with her children to personally unveil Albert’s statue which stands proudly in the heart of the town, and on our visit we stood under it in the Christmas market drinking our Glühwein.

Prince Albert in Coburg Photo: http://www.coburg-tourist.de

Prince Albert’s statue in Marktplatz, Coburg

Victoria’s final visit to Coburg was in 1894 when the royal families of Europe gathered for the wedding of Victoria’s grand-daughter to the Grand Duke of Hesse. It was only 20 years before the outbreak of the First World War when even the close family ties of Europe’s royal families could not prevent cousin fighting against cousin.

The Coburg’s ‘marriage policy’ had been spectacularly successful but as the English royal family changed their name to Windsor during the First World War, many of the Coburg connections have been forgotten. We enjoyed re-discovering them on our visit to Coburg and seeing the town through Victoria’s eyes as she visited her beloved Albert’s hometown in Germany.

Read more about our visit to Coburg

Christmas in Coburg – discovering the seaonal magic in Germany

A weekend in Coburg: Castles and Royal Connections

Plan your Visit to Coburg

For more information about what there is to see and do in Coburg, visit the Coburg Tourism website and follow them on their social media channels: Facebook and Twitter. You can also find information to plan your holidays in Germany at the Germany Tourism Website.

From the UK you can reach Coburg via Nuremberg airport (1 hr 15 min drive), Frankfurt (2 hrs 50 mins drive) or Munich (2 hrs 50 mins drive) and we recommend hiring a car, which will enable you to easily visit all the castles and places of interest around Coburg.

We flew from Bristol to Frankfurt with bmi regional who fly up to three times daily between Bristol and Frankfurt. One way fares cost from £93 and as with all bmi flights, include a generous 23kg of hold luggage, a complimentary in-flight drink and breakfast snack, allocated seating and a speedy 30 minute check-in.

Where to stay in Coburg

We stayed at Hotel Villa Victoria in Coburg (so many things are named for Victoria and Albert), which was the perfect place to spend a few days while exploring the town and the castles nearby. The accommodation is in a very pretty turn of the century villa, just outside the old town walls, with convenient parking outside for our hire car (although the spaces quickly filled up). In the villa are 12 rooms and ours was a most delightful suite with adjoining sitting room and view of the city gatehouse.

Villa Victoria in Coburg Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Villa Victoria in Coburg

The house had been beautifully renovated and we had the use of a guest sitting room on the same floor, with a tea and coffee station on the landing. We especially enjoyed breakfast in the charmingly furnished ground floor room, with pretty floral china and lace tablecloths. Across the road is a more modern residence, and guests staying there can also have breakfast in the villa, but I would check when you book that you can have a room in the older house if possible.

Breakfast at Villa Victoria in Coburg Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Breakfast at Villa Victoria in Coburg

Despite the name, you should be aware that Hotel Villa Victoria is more of a guest house than a hotel; for instance when we arrived mid afternoon there was no-one manning the reception and we had to call the owner who gave us instructions on how to find our key. When staying here be sure to let the owners know at what time you will be arriving and make arrangements accordingly.

Sitting room at Hotel Villa Victoria in Coburg

Sitting room at Hotel Villa Victoria in Coburg

Thanks to German National Tourist Board who hosted my visit to Coburg and to BMI Regional who covered my flight via Frankfurt.

Pin It

Read about Royal Coburg

 

This article is originally published at Heatheronhertravels.com – Read the original article here

Click to subscribe to our monthly newsletter, news and reader offers

HOHT newsletter

 

A weekend in Coburg, Germany – castles and royal connections

The pretty town of Coburg, like many others in Germany, offers picturesque medieval buildings, a charming town square and cosy cafés to while away a weekend. But Coburg’s palaces and castles tell another tale, of an ambitious noble family that spread its influence by marriage through most of the royal courts of Europe.

A weekend in Coburg

The town is best known as the birthplace of Prince Albert, husband of Queen Victoria, who grew up at Schloss Rosenau just outside Coburg. The royal couple visited several times before Albert’s untimely death in 1861 and Queen Victoria always had a great affection for Rosenau, writing; “Were I not what I am, this would be my real home.” Victoria and Albert were first cousins and their uncle Leopold, King of the Belgians, arranged numerous advantageous matches for his nieces and nephews around the royal courts of Europe. Small wonder then, that the town of Coburg has hosted so many royal and other notable visitors over the centuries.

The charming medieval streets of Coburg

When Guy and I visited Coburg in December, we started our town walk at the Martktplatz, the central town square that’s surrounded by pictureque medieval buildings. On one side is the town hall with a statue of the town’s patron, St Maurice standing on the gables. I’ll tell you his story in a moment, but you’ll spot that he’s holding the baton of a Roman marshal, although the people of Coburg say that his stick is to measure the correct size of their famous sausage. On the opposite side of the square is the Stadhaus, built by Duke Johann Casamir in the 1600s as the administrative centre for the Dukes of Coburg. It’s just that bit bigger and grander than the town hall with statues above the gables and prominent oriel windows on the corners – the Duke wanted everyone to know who was in charge around here!

Medieval buildings in Coburg Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Medieval buildings in Coburg

Spreading out from Martkplatz, are narrow streets with many beautiful old buildings. As we wandered around we noticed the old pharmacy on the square with a symbol of the ostrich, which dates back to the 14th century and is still a pharmacy today. Near our hotel was one of the three gates around the town, that are all that remain of the inner and outer walls that once surrounded Coburg. The town walls were largely demolished in the 18th century when they were no longer required for protection and were falling into disrepair.

Albertsplatz in Coburg Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Albertsplatz in Coburg

Nearby Albertplatz is a charming open space where we watched some ice carving and street performers as part of the Advent festivities. The houses that originally stood here were demolished to make way for the statue of Prince Albert that Queen Victoria commissioned after his death. The Queen, however, decided that there was no way her beloved Albert was to be sidelined to the second square of Coburg and so the statue was repositioned to the prime spot at the centre of Marktplatz.

Marktplatz in Coburg Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Marktplatz in Coburg

The Queen unveiled Albert’s statue herself in 1865, one of six visits she made to Coburg, the place that held so many happy memories and family connections for her. While we were visiting, the Christmas market was in full swing, so Prince Albert’s statue was enclosed by a canopy to stand under and drink our Glühwein – would Queen Victoria have approved I wondered?

St Maurice in Coburg

All around the town you might notice a moor’s head on mountains, public buildings and even man-hole covers. He’s St Maurice, patron saint of the city of Coburg as well as many other towns, who was adopted by the rulers of Coburg, to appear on their coats of arms from the Middle Ages. St Maurice was the leader of a Roman Legion and originally from Thebes in Egypt, hence North African rather than the negroid appearance he is normally given.

St Maurice in Coburg Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

St Maurice in Coburg

As a Christian, he was martyred after refusing to worship Roman Gods while on campaign in what is now Switzerland – the town of St Moriz where he died was also named after him. Around 1100 the German Emperor decided to move St Maurice’s remains to his new cathedral at Magdeburg and the procession passed through Coburg, giving rise to a cult of the saint in the town. His image appears in numerous places and coats of arms to this day, adopted by the Dukes of Coburg who were always on the look-out for something to add to their prestige.

Martin Luther in Coburg

Another notable visitor to Coburg was Martin Luther, the great reformer who spent 6 months in Coburg in the safety of the Veste fortress in 1530. This year will mark the 500th anniversary of the start of the protestant reformation, when Luther nailed his theses to the church door of Wittenberg in 1517. While his patron Elector Johann Friederich and a party of nobles continued to the diet of Ausburg to meet with the Emperor, Luther studied, worked on translations of the Bible and was in constant touch by letter with the events at Ausburg.

Luther rooms in Veste Coburg Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Luther rooms in Veste Coburg

Among the many interesting things to see in Veste Coburg are the rooms where Luther is said to have spent his time, with his portrait hanging on the wall. Since Luther had been both outlawed and excommunicated, he was supposed to stay incognito, and referred to the fortress in his letters as ‘the realm of the jackdaws” after the birds that squawked outside his window. An adjoining room was created to commemorate Luther in 1844 by Duke Ernst II of Saxony-Coburg and Gotha, which contains other paintings of Luther and the beautiful Hedwig Tumbler.

Luther and the Hedwig Tumbler at Veste Coburg Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Luther and the Hedwig Tumbler at Veste Coburg

This coloured drinking glass from the 12th century was given as a gift to Luther and was said to have originally belonged to Saint Elizabeth of Thuringia and have healing powers. Apparently it was in great demand by pregnant women, since a drink from the tumbler was said to bring the blessings of the saint for a safe birth.

A walk up the hill to Veste Coburg

From the town of Coburg, we enjoyed a lovely walk up the hill through the Hofgarten park to the fortress that overlooks the town. The Veste Coburg overlooks the surrounding countryside, with thick walls, ramparts and towers and was the residence of the Princes of Saxe-Coburg until they moved to the Ehrenburg Palace in the town in the 16th century. We spent a fascinating few hours looking around the different parts of the castle, some medieval, some more modern since this was also the home of Duke Carl Eduard of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha from 1910 who installed the modern comforts of bathrooms and electricity.

Walking up to the Veste Fortress Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Walking up to the Veste Fortress

The castle is now a museum containing all the art collections and treasures of the Saxe-Coburg family with everything from Venetian glass, carriages and suits of armour, to a fine collection of medieval religious paintings. You can walk the ramparts and peer down on Coburg and the surrounding countryside just like the soldiers of past centuries – if you don’t want to go in the museum, access to the courtyards and ramparts is free. Within the walls there’s also the Burgschenke Inn, which is perfect for a slice of apple strudel or a hearty Sunday lunch, after your brisk walk up the hill!

The art collections in Veste Coburg Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

The art collections in Veste Coburg

Ehrenburg Palace

Coburg may be a modest sized town, but it has another large palace in addition to Veste Coburg. Ehrenburg Palace was built from 1543 on the site of an abandoned Franciscan monastery, when Duke Johann Ernst decided that it would be more convenient to live in town than in the fortress up on the hill. The palace was inspired by the fashionable renaissance palazzos of Italy and was rebuilt in baroque style after a fire in the 17th century and further improved by Duke Ernst I, father of Prince Albert.

Ehrenburg Palace in Coburg Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Ehrenburg Palace in Coburg

The lavish state apartments are painted in the fashionably bright colours of the 18th century, filled with portraits of the Coburg Dukes, the ceilings covered with ornate plasterwork and dripping with chandeliers. With relations in most of the royal courts of Europe, the Coburgs needed a place they could entertain in style such as the ornately decorated ‘Hall of Giants’ that hosted a meeting between Queen Victoria and Austrian Emperor Franz Joseph in 1864.

Ehrenburg Palace in Coburg Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Ehrenburg Palace in Coburg

Around Coburg – the castles of Rosenau and Callenberg

Just outside Coburg we visited Schloss Rosenau, the birthplace of Prince Albert and a favourite with Queen Victoria. The castle is set on a hill, surrounded by parkland and despite the colourful interiors, beautiful paintings and Biedermeier furniture, we felt the romance and human scale of Rosenau. It was used as a summer residence by Duke Ernst I, father of Prince Albert and after he married Victoria, she ordered paintings of the castle and interiors to remind the homesick Albert of his birthplace.

Schloss Rosenau near Coburg Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Schloss Rosenau near Coburg

The original paintings are in Windsor castle but copies were used more recently to restore the castle to its 19th century appearance, when it was renovated by Ernst I in romantic medieval style. There’s a point on the castle drive known as the Queen’s view, where the Queen would stop her carriage to have one last nostalgic look up at the castle on the hill, before driving back to Coburg.

Also a 15 minute drive from the town is Schloss Callenberg, which is the residence of Prince Andreas, the head of the house of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha. The rooms are decorated with beautiful paintings and there’s an unusual shooting museum here as well as rooms dedicated to portraits and memorabilia of Victoria and Albert and their large family.

Schloss Callenburg in Coburg Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Schloss Callenburg in Coburg

Also worth a visit is the small town of Seßlach, which we visited for the Christmas market held at the beginning of Advent. It’s a pretty small town, full of picturesque half timbered houses, with cafes, inns and craft shops, a great place to stop for lunch and a wander round if you’re visiting Coburg for the weekend or driving through the region.

Sesslach near Coburg Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Sesslach near Coburg

Where to eat in Coburg

The people of Coburg are extremely proud of their Coburg Bratwurst, a long, thin, sausage that’s traditionally cooked over a wood fire of pine cones and served in a crisp white roll. It’s made with a mixture of beef and pork, with a smoky flavour from the fire which needs only a squirt of mustard for the authentic Coburg taste. You’ll find a van selling the Coburger on Marktplatz all year round, since the local butchers take turns to have a stall there.

Coburg Sausage in Coburg, Germany Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Coburg Bratwurst in Coburg, Germany

Our favourite place to eat was Restaurant 1627 which provides a light and healthy alternative to some of the ‘meat and dumplings’ dishes that are a foundation of German cuisine. It’s named after the year that the house was built to supply the Ehrenberg Palace just across the road and is part bar, part restaurant. The menu is short with just a few main course, vegetarian and desert options – my pan fried fish with salad and baguette on the side was delicious with a house cocktail.

Dinner at Restaurant 1627 in Coburg, germany Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Dinner at Restaurant 1627 in Coburg, Germany

If you want something more hearty and traditional, we also tried the roast pork and Coburg dumplings, washed down with local beer, at Brauhaus du Coburg. It serves the equivalent of pub fare and is tucked down a lane just off Marktplatz with a brewery next door where you can admire the copper stills through the window. This is the place to try the Coburg dumpling, which is made of raw and cooked potato and is very soft – like a ball of mashed potato that collapses with a sigh onto your plate.

Dinner at Brauhaus in Coburg Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Dinner at Brauhaus in Coburg

Of course, when you need a break from the sightseeing, a stop for kaffee und kuchen is a must, to cosy up in winter or watch the world pass by in summer. We liked the style of Queens Café on Albertsplatz with a wide selection of delicious cakes and light dishes – in summer it has plenty of outdoor seating on the square. We also stopped at Feyler, which has a café and impressive selection of cakes and chocolates, including seasonal biscuits like the Coburger Schmätzchen which are sold at Christmas.

Coffee and cake at Queens Cafe in Coburg Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Coffee and cake at Queens Cafe in Coburg

Delicious Souvenirs to bring home from Coburg

These days I prefer to bring back delicious edible souvenirs from my travels, rather than ornaments that will end up gathering dust on the shelf. We stopped at the Chocolate Coburg shop (Ketschengasse 9), to stock up on my favourite marzipan chocolates and at Feyler (Rosengasse 6-8) for those spicy German biscuits which vary with the season and the locality, since every region has their own variation. In winter you should look out for the Nurenberger Lebkuchen and the Coburger Schmätzchen which come plain or covered in chocolate flecked with gold leaf.

Delicious souvenirs from Coburg Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Delicious souvenirs from Coburg

At the Coburger Bratwurst stall in Marktplatz you’ll also find that they sell the cooked sausages in vacuum packs which you can easily pack in your luggage, so that you can savour the smoky flavour at home. We also enjoyed browsing the postcards and stationary at Veste-Verlag Roßteutscher (Steingasse 16) opposite the Ehrenberg palace, where we bought a gorgeous advent calendar with snow sprinkled local scenes.

Read More: Christmas in Coburg – discovering the seaonal magic in Germany

Plan your Visit to Coburg

For more information about what there is to see and do in Coburg, visit the Coburg Tourism website and follow them on their social media channels: Facebook and Twitter. You can also find information to plan your holidays in Germany at the Germany Tourism Website.

From the UK you can reach Coburg via Nuremberg airport (1 hr 15 min drive), Frankfurt (2 hrs 50 mins drive) or Munich (2 hrs 50 mins drive) and we recommend hiring a car, which will enable you to easily visit all the castles and places of interest around Coburg.

We flew from Bristol to Frankfurt with bmi regional who fly up to three times daily between Bristol and Frankfurt. One way fares cost from £93 and as with all bmi flights, include a generous 23kg of hold luggage, a complimentary in-flight drink and breakfast snack, allocated seating and a speedy 30 minute check-in.

Where to stay in Coburg

We stayed at Hotel Villa Victoria in Coburg (so many things are named for Victoria and Albert), which was the perfect place to spend a few days while exploring the town and the castles nearby. The accommodation is in a very pretty turn of the century villa, just outside the old town walls, with convenient parking outside for our hire car (although the spaces quickly filled up). In the villa are 12 rooms and ours was a most delightful suite with adjoining sitting room and view of the city gatehouse.

Villa Victoria in Coburg Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Villa Victoria in Coburg

The house had been beautifully renovated and we had the use of a guest sitting room on the same floor, with a tea and coffee station on the landing. We especially enjoyed breakfast in the charmingly furnished ground floor room, with pretty floral china and lace tablecloths. Across the road is a more modern residence, and guests staying there can also have breakfast in the villa, but I would check when you book that you can have a room in the older house if possible.

Breakfast at Villa Victoria in Coburg Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Breakfast at Villa Victoria in Coburg

Despite the name, you should be aware that Hotel Villa Victoria is more of a guest house than a hotel; for instance when we arrived mid afternoon there was no-one manning the reception and we had to call the owner who gave us instructions on how to find our key. When staying here be sure to let the owners know at what time you will be arriving and make arrangements accordingly.

Sitting room at Hotel Villa Victoria in Coburg

Sitting room at Hotel Villa Victoria in Coburg

Thanks to German National Tourist Board who hosted my visit to Coburg and to BMI Regional who covered my flight via Frankfurt.

Pin It

A weekend in Coburg, castles and royal connections

This article is originally published at Heatheronhertravels.com – Read the original article here

Click to subscribe to our monthly newsletter, news and reader offers

HOHT newsletter

Where Heather travelled in 2016

As we start a new year I’m enjoying the memories of last year’s travels, like flicking through a photo album in my head. I visited new places, returned to old favourites and had a great mix of travels with family, friends and the occasional solo trip. This year is wide open to new travel possibilities, but before we move on let’s take a moment to revisit some of the places I travelled in 2016.

Where Heather travelled in 2016

February – a weekend of culture in the Lake District

The Lake District

The Lake District

My weekend in the Lake District brought back memories of family holidays as a child, when we stayed in an old stone cottage in the Easter holidays. This time I was there with my blogging friends and Travelator Media colleagues, Zoe and Kathryn, to enjoy a cottage stay with the Good Life Cottage Company. Despite the rain we had a great time discovering the cultural side of the Lakes, at Blackwell Arts and Crafts House, Beatrix Potter’s Hilltop Farm and Wordworth’s Dove Cottage, getting out for a blustery walk on Elterwater when the rain finally stopped.

Read More: A weekend of culture in the Lake District (or what to do if it rains)

February – a spring break in Athens

Acropolis in Athens Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Acropolis in Athens

Later in February I visited Athens with my parents and sister who lives in Greece, gathering for the weekend at the classic and elegant Electra Palace Hotel. The warm and sunny weather gave us the opportunity to visit the Acropolis without the scorching heat and crowds that descend on Athens in summer. We loved the fresh spring days, wandering around all the ancient sites and relaxing in a pavement cafes of Plaka to watch the world go by.

Read More: Visiting the Acropolis in Athens: here’s what you need to know

March – A Caribbean adventure in St Kitts

St Kitts Christophe Harbour Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

St Kitts Christophe Harbour

March took me to St Kitts, my first ever taste of the Caribbean, where I explored this island that is one half of the island federation of St Kitts and Nevis. I found a laid back and slightly scruffy charm, with lush fields that once grew sugar cane, plantation house hotels and a growing list of stylish new bars and hotels. I tried lobster on the beach and rum cocktails at Salt Plage, learned about the local medicinal plants on a rainforest walk and saw the batik being made at Romney Manor. The visit gave me a desire to visit more Caribbean islands, which despite being small in size are surprisingly diverse, each with its own character.

Read More: A stylish traveller’s guide to St Kitts

March – Cliff walks on the Gower in Wales

Walking on the Gower

Walking on the Gower

I’ve visited the Gower Peninsula in South Wales a few times now, since my son was at university there and in March we made a return visit to the lovely Promenade View in Mumbles. With husband Guy, my son and his friends we explored the coastal paths and gorgeous beaches of the Gower, breezing along the cliff paths of Pennard Cliffs and Three Cliffs Bay. We even clambered along the peninsula of Worms Head, just making it back before the tide turned and covered the jagged rocks with the sea again.

Read More: The Gower in Wales – find your perfect coastal walk and place to stay

April – A farmhouse stay in Costa Brava

Costa Brava in Catalunya

Costa Brava in Catalunya

After Easter it was off to Costa Brava, for a family break in a large and luxurious farmhouse (read my review) through Charming Villas. The fields around the house were bright yellow with rapeseed and from the bedrooms we had views over the olive trees to the snow capped Pyrenees in the distance. We spent a day in Girona, with pretty pastel houses lining the river, visited the Salvador Dali museum at Figueres and had a tapas lunch in the sunshine at Cadaques, before walking over the headland to Dali’s fishermens cottages in Port Lligat.

Read More: A driving tour of Costa Brava

April – Northern Ireland’s Causeway Coast

Causeway Coast in Northern Ireland Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Causeway Coast in Northern Ireland

On Northern Ireland’s scenic Causeway Coast I found windswept golden beaches, ruined castles and of course what most visitors come to see, the Giant’s Causeway. Along with the stunning landscape of the Causeway, I braved the Carrick-A-Rede rope bridge and visited the photogenic Mussenden Temple perched on the cliff-top, staying at the fabulous Bushmills Inn where a welcoming peat fire always burns. I also dipped into the thriving artizan food culture, with fabulous seafood and outstanding quality meat, all served up in huge portions with a healthy dollop of friendly Irish charm.

Read More: 10 fab foodie stops on Northern Ireland’s Causeway Coast

May – Visiting laid back Menorca

Hiking in Menorca

Hiking in Menorca

May took me to Menorca, the smallest and calmest of the Balearic islands, a place that doesn’t like to boast too much about its charms, but is full of history, fashion and great food. I spent a day exploring Mahón, the elegant capital of the island, walked to unspoiled beaches along the Cami de Cavalls and  visited some of the island’s fascinating Talayotic monuments. Menorca has all the ingredients for a delightful break with mellow old buildings in Cuitadella, stylish shopping and lazy seafood lunches by the port.

Read More: How to spend a perfect day in Mahon, Menorca

June – A Uniworld Cruise through Burgundy and Provence

On a Burgundy river cruise

On a Burgundy river cruise

With husband Guy I took a Uniworld river cruise with Titan Travel through the South of France, from Lyon in the heart of Burgundy, to the medieval walled city of Avignon in Provence. The week flew by with rich insights into local culture and history, as we uncovered the secret passages of Lyon, visited the Papal Palace at Avignon and dipped into the world of Van Gough at Arles. Along the way there were plenty of opportunities to discover the delicious food and wine of Burgundy in vineyards, cookery classes and on board Uniworld’s extremely luxurious SS Catherine.

Read More: 10 things to expect on a river cruise with Uniworld

July – A road trip across Canada by RV

Canada RV trip Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Canada RV trip

As a child our family were great campers, and in July I rediscovered the great outdoors in a road trip driving a motorhome (or RV as it’s known in Canada) from Toronto to Montreal. With husband Guy, I mastered how to navigate and park up our home-on-wheels and enjoyed a range of outdoor activities like cycling, hiking and kayaking in Canada’s National Parks. We also found that with a bit of planning it’s perfectly possible to visit Canada’s vibrant cities on an RV road trip. InToronto, Ottawa and Montreal we dipped into cultural highlights from totem poles to street art and new tastes from Poutine to Maple beer.

Read More: How to drive an RV from Toronto to Montreal (Our top tips)

August – Cycling in Dorset

Cycling in Dorset Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Cycling in Dorset

With the end of the summer in sight I went cycling with my daughter in Dorset, one of England’s prettiest counties. We set off from Dorchester, stopping for tea in Moreton and lunch overlooking Lulworth cove, passing Lulworth castle before finishing our ride in Wareham. We loved the quiet lanes, rolling countryside and sea views, not to mention all those impossibly picturesque thatched cottages, reminding me just how pretty England can be.

Read More: Cycling in Dorset on the Jurassic Coast

August – An active river cruise on the Danube

Melk abbey in Austria Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

In August I took a short cruise with Avalon, starting with the cultural jewel of Vienna and passing through Austria’s scenic Wachau Valley until we reached Melk Abbey and disembarked at Linz. In Vienna we learned how to bake bread Austrian style, enjoyed the coffee culture and got to know the famous Lippizanner stallions in the Spanish Riding School. I also had the chance to try out many of the active excursions on offer, cycling past orchards heavy with plums and canoing down river with views of well kept vines in neat rows along the hillside.

Read More: Getting active in Austria’s Wachau Valley

Summer in Bristol

Ferry in Bristol Harbour Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Ferry in Bristol Harbour

This year I’ve tried to enjoy more of my home town of Bristol, especially in the summer when there are so many festivals and things going on. I’ve discovered so much more of what’s on my own doorstep with levels of creativity and cool that had previously passed me by. In 2017 I hope to connect even more with all the fabulous things going on in Bristol so if you are thinking of paying a visit do let me know and I’ll be happy to give you some recommendations.

Read More: 10 Cool things to do on Bristol’s Harbourside

September – Hiking in the Dolomites South Tyrol

Hiking in the Dolomites

Hiking in the Dolomites

Every year my friend Julia and I set off for a mountain hiking holiday, and this year we chose the South Tyrol in Northern Italy for our girl’s own adventure. Setting off from the luxurious Hotel Cyprianerhof, we made a circular route around the Rosengarten or Catinaccio range, staying in the mountain huts of the Dolomites. The trip gave us the challenge of climbing over high mountain passes and huts with limited facilities (what no shower?) but rewarded us with amazing views and a sense of achievement when we returned to Cyrianerhof for a well earned aperitif admiring the peaks we had climbed over.

Read More: Hiking in the Dolomite – a tour of the Rosengarten in South Tyrol

October – a sunshine break in Aruba

At the archaeology museum in Aruba Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

At the archaeology museum in Aruba

October took me for some much needed sunshine to Aruba in the Dutch Antilles. I found a warm welcome at Amsterdam Manor Resort, indeed everywhere on Aruba which describes itself as “One Happy Island”.  I found an island of contrasts – on one side a well developed tourist strip with white sand beaches, on the other a wild northern shore with waves breaking onto the jagged rocks and little in the way of development. There’s a sophisticated and cosmopolitan food scene and I loved the street art murals in San Nicholas, showing an unexpected side of the Caribbean.

Read More: My 10 favourite things about Aruba

November – 48 Hours in Florence

The Duomo in Florence Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

The Duomo in Florence

With the summer over and Christmas in sight, I nipped off to Florence for a weekend break with Citalia, to get a quick fix of culture and good food. Of course I saw the best known sights, like the Duomo and the David but also took some time to soak up the atmosphere and charm of this ancient city set in the heart of Tuscany. I loved the bustle and great food in the Mercado Centrale where I found a local tripe festival in full swing, dipped into the Salvador Ferragamo shoe museum and wandered through the Boboli gardens behind the Pitti Palace with views over the teracotta roofs of Florence.

Read More: How to spend a perfect weekend in Florence

December – Finding the Christmas spirit in Coburg, Germany

Christmas market in Coburg, Germany Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Christmas market in Coburg, Germany

My final trip of 2016 took me to Coburg in Germany, where early in December we caught the first weekend of the Christmas Markets to soak up some seasonal spirit. This pretty town, with medieval buildings clustered around the town square, was also the birthplace of Prince Albert, consort of Queen Victoria who visited Coburg several times. As well as enjoying the mulled wine and Coburger Bratwurst cooked over a smoky wood fire, we visited the elegant palaces of Ehrenberg, Rosenhau and the Veste fortress overlooking the town where Martin Luther stayed and worked for a few months.

Read More: Christmas in Coburg – Discovering th seasonal magic in Coburg

What’s next for 2017?

At the moment the New Year is wide open for travel plans with just a few things pencilled in and lots of possibilities. So far I’ll be off to:

Dublin in January – my son has just started university at Trinity College, Dublin so I hope to pay him a visit with my parents. You can read about our last trip – 10 fun things we did on a weekend in Dublin

The Liffey in Dublin Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

The Liffey in Dublin

Seefeld, Austria in February – as a travel blogger I often come across places on blog trips that I want to return to with the family and Seefeld was one of them. I was there in September 2015 on a walking holiday and fell in love with the pretty resort of Seefeld which is also a popular winter-snow destination. I’ll be returning there in February to try out some of the outdoor snow activities like cross-country ski, snow-shoe and winter hiking with my husband and friends. I’ll be trying to have a proper holiday (believe it or not blog trips do involve quite a lot of work!) but I’ll still be posting some photos on my social media channels.

Otherwise I have on my wish list to see more of the Caribbean, Canada and generally explore some new destinations further afield as well as enjoying all the great stuff in Bristol where I live.

Whatever your plans for 2017, I hope that health, peace and happiness follow you, wherever you travel this year.

Pin It

Read about where Heather Travelled in 2016

This article is originally published at Heatheronhertravels.com – Read the original article here

Click to subscribe to our monthly newsletter, news and reader offers

HOHT newsletter

Next Page »