South Tyrol – our final days hiking in the Dolomites

It’s become a tradition for my friend Julia and I to spend a few days walking each year, and last September we were testing ourself in the Rosengarten range, part of the Dolomites of South Tyrol. I’ve already written about Day 1 in which we scaled the gentler slopes and Day 2 in which we scrambled over a high pass to walk through a rocky lunar landscape. Now you’ll hear about Day 3 and 4 of our walk to the final mountain refuge along a grassy plateau and our precipitous descent to the valley again for a welcome return to the lovely Hotel Cyprianerhof, where we had started our walk.

Hiking in the Dolomites

Hiking in the Dolomites

We set off from Rifugio Bergamo

After breakfast at Rifugio Bergamo (also known as Grasleitenhütte) we were packed and ready to leave, just as the sun was creeping up to the terrace. We had very much enjoyed our stay at this wood panelled mountain lodge, which had been originally built as a base for mountaineers and was full of nostalgic books and old photographs. We took some departure photos with the owner Hans, a strongly built and bearded man of the mountains, who showed us photos of the festival he runs at the hut when everyone dresses up for that bygone era when the hut was built.

Heather and Julia at Kolnerhutte

Heather and Julia at Kolnerhutte

Descending the hill we looked back at the rifugio still in shade, perched in a cleft between two rockfaces. It was amazing to consider how it could be built in such a remote spot. All we could hear was the rushing of the mountain river that cascaded down behind the rifugio and looking up could see the white streaks of airplane jets making criss-cross patterns in the sky.

Hiking from Rifugio Bergamo in South Tyrol

Hiking from Rifugio Bergamo in South Tyrol

The sun warmed us as we skirted the mountain side on a balcony path, with views of the valleys ahead and pine forests below. The path descended to cross another mountain river where we hopped over boulders and then continued upwards on the other side of the gully.

Leaving Rifugio Bergamo in South Tyrol

Leaving Rifugio Bergamo in South Tyrol

A difficult climb to Rifugio Alpe di Tires

After crossing a few more pebble filled mountain streams the path became steeper and steeper, winding up through the rocky landscape. Now we were scrambling and climbing rather than hiking, with metal cables and ropes to help us in the most exposed places. With rocks sliding under my feet and no karabiner to clip me on safely, I must admit I was quite scared at this point. After my fall in Austria the year before, I knew how easy it would be to slip on the gravel surfaces, with a heavy rucksack to drag me down. I slowed down the pace and breathed deeply to calm myself, leaning into the rock and taking it one step at a time until we reached the top of the slope.

Hiking in the Dolomites

Hiking in the Dolomites

Thankfully, the path at the top of the slope was much easier, winding through a flower-filled meadow and we decided to take a detour to Rifugio Alpe di Tires which we could see up on our right. The beautiful modern refuge with its bright red roof, sat on a grassy plateau, on the saddle between two valleys with fantastic views in both directions. The terrace  and cafe were full of walkers and climbers and the stylish interior would not have been out of place as a hip city hangout. As grey clouds gathered, the 10 minute stop we’d planned turned into an hour, with a rain shower bringing mountain bikers and hikers running inside. Still it was no hardship to stay a little longer, sipping our raspberry lemonade.

Read about our our first day’s hike – Hiking in the Dolomites – a tour of the Rosengarten

Read about our second day’s hike – Over the pass in the Dolomites – hiking in South Tyrol

Hiking in the Dolomites

Hiking in the Dolomites

Leaving Rifugio Alpe di Tires

As blue skies re-appeared, we set off on the path that skirted the mountain, until Rifugio Alpe di Tires was just a tiny toy house in the distance, easy to spot because of the red roof. As the path climbed ever higher, I was worried that we might be in for a repeat of the vertical rock climb, but was reassured that the path must be quite manageable when we passed walkers accompanied by their dogs.

Signpost hiking in the Dolomites

Signpost hiking in the Dolomites

Now we were practically level with the tops of the grey rocky crags across the valley and reached a grassy plateau where blue flowers like larkspur were blooming in the meadow. The fence with a gate, told us that there must be cows up here, munching their way through the grass, surrounded by stunning mountain scenery.

Blue flowers on our hike in South Tyrol

Blue flowers on our hike in South Tyrol

The final walk to Rifugio Bolzano

Beside the path was a large cairn of rocks and from here we could see Rifugio Bolzano where we’d be spending the night. Although it seemed to be just a short walk across the grass plateau, we knew that distances in the mountain are not easily judged by the eye and that it would be nearly two hours before we arrived there.

Cairn in the Dolomites

Cairn in the Dolomites

After our climb, it was time for a break and a rest, so we shrugged off the rucksacks and took 20 minutes for a snack and a drink. I took the opportunity to take a few photos, while my friend Julia lay on the grass for some quiet time, contemplating the views.

Julia resting in the Dolomites

Julia resting in the Dolomites

Just as we left our rest spot, the sky darkened and the rain started to come down, turning the gravel path into sticky mud. With waterproofs on, we trudged along the path across the plateau, marked by a series of white cairns and nearly two hours later arrived drenched at Rifugio Bolzano.

Read about our our first day’s hike – Hiking in the Dolomites – a tour of the Rosengarten

Read about our second day’s hike – Over the pass in the Dolomites – hiking in South Tyrol

Hiking in the Dolomites South Tyrol

Hiking in the Dolomites South Tyrol

A cosy stay at Rifugio Bolzano

What a relief it was to take off our muddy boots and wet waterproofs, to hang up our poles and enter the cosy, wood panelled dining area. We found the place was already full of families, with children playing games and relaxing before dinner time. Rifugio Bolzano was built over 100 years ago and with 47 beds is one of the larger refuges in the area – we soon settled into our private room with wooden beds and threw open the window for a view of the mountain.

Dining at Rifugio Bolzano

Dining at Rifugio Bolzano

We were slightly taken aback to find that there were no showers at the refuge, only communal washrooms where we had to take our chance for a bit of privacy. Still the atmosphere was friendly and convivial as we settled in with a drink and then ordered a dinner of hearty mountain fare, with the filling kaiserschmarrn pancakes for desert.

Rifugio Bolzano in South Tyrol

Rifugio Bolzano in South Tyrol

By the morning, the showers had passed and the rain seemed to have washed the air clean, revealing sunny views of the jagged rocky teeth that make the distinctive landscape of the Dolomites.

View from Rifugio Bolzano in South Tyrol

View from Rifugio Bolzano in South Tyrol

Our final day hiking back to Cyprianerhof

From Rifugio Bolzano we walked gently downhill across green pasture dotted with white standing stones, feeling a little bit like Hansel and Gretel following the trail. At the end of the plateau we could see down into the valley, although it was difficult to identify on the map which of the villages might be below us. Somewhere behind the ridges before us lay the luxurious Hotel Cyprianerhof, which we were very much looking forward to reaching that evening.

Hiking near Rifugio Bolzano in South Tyrol

Hiking near Rifugio Bolzano in South Tyrol

From the plateau the path became a narrow ribbon, zig-zagging steeply downwards, taking us towards the valley. Despite going downhill, the descent was by no means easy and as we got closer to the tree line, there were more steep steps with tree roots and the gravel was slippery from rain showers. After a couple of hours we reached a cross where there was a lovely picnic table for us to take a break and eat some of our snacks. The worst of the descent was now over although we had our waterproofs on and off with frequent showers, and there was still a good 3 hours to walk before we would reach the hotel.

Read about our our first day’s hike – Hiking in the Dolomites – a tour of the Rosengarten

Read about our second day’s hike – Over the pass in the Dolomites – hiking in South Tyrol

Hiking in the Dolomites

Hiking in the Dolomites

A walk through the forest in South Tyrol

We now skirted along the side of the slope through forest, the smell of cow dung mixed with the scent of pine needles. The air was cool and damp in the shade of the forest canopy and moss gathered around the tree roots. Along the trail were a few wooden sculptures, carved from trees and logs that must have fallen there; an overhanging giant mushroom and a fierce eagle’s head jutting into the path.

Walking back to St Cyprian

Walking back to St Cyprian

At times the path crossed tricking streams that had been channeled into wooden troughs where you could stop for a drink or fill up a water bottle. Through gaps between the trees we could look down into the valley and from down below the sound of Sunday church bells and a brass band practicing in the church wafted up to greet us. The gentle walk gave me time to absorb the details of the forest, the tiny pine cones crunching underfoot and the orange mushrooms the size of a coin set into the bright green clumps of moss.

Hiking back to St Cyprian in the Dolomites

Hiking back to St Cyprian in the Dolomites

The final descent to Cyprianerhof

Now we were on the downward slope, on a wide track that would take us down to St Cyprian in the green valley, with the distinctive jagged peaks of the Dolomites rising in the distance – the ones that we had climbed over just a few days before. We have a tradition on our hikes of taking a ‘Before’ and ‘After’ photo and so on arriving at Cyprianerhof, we grabbed a passing walker to take a picture of us –  tired but thrilled at the prospect of the luxury that awaited us. Take a look the picture below – I think you can guess which is the ‘Before’ and which the ‘After’ ?

Before and after our hike in South Tyrol

Before and after our hike in South Tyrol

After four days and three nights in the mountains, staying in simple accommodation with limited shower facilities, you can imagine what a treat it was to enter our room at Cyprianerhof. It was all as lovely as we remembered; the luxurious natural fabrics and cosy faux fur throw, the huge bathroom with polished stone sinks and the apple on the bed to remind us to stay healthy in the mountains.

Bedroom at Cyprianerhof in South Tyrol

Bedroom at Cyprianerhof in South Tyrol

A well deserved Aperitif after our walk

Soon the wild women of the mountain were transformed into chic and sleek creatures, with freshly washed hair and make-up, changed into the clean clothes that we had left at the hotel – what bliss! It was time for a well deserved aperitif at the drinks party offered for hotel guests on the lawn outside; a Hugo for me and an Aperol Spritz for Julia.

Heather and Julia at the end of the hike

Heather and Julia at the end of the hike

With the view of the peaks that we’d climbed on our first day, we toasted our success and endurance in scaling those rock-faces, climbing over the passes, and surviving the lack of showers with only hearty mountain dishes and the odd beer to sustain us. Now we deserved the delicious meal and elegant surroundings that awaited us at Cyprianerhof – we’d certainly earned it!

A well earned aperitif in the Dolomites

A well earned aperitif in the Dolomites

Read about our our first day’s hike – Hiking in the Dolomites – a tour of the Rosengarten

Read about our second day’s hike – Over the pass in the Dolomites – hiking in South Tyrol

Where we stayed in South Tyrol

To compare prices and book Hotels in South Tyrol on HotelsCombined.

Night 1 – Hotel Cyprianerhof

Website: Cyprianerhof.com A luxurious 4 star hotel in St Cyprian with extensive facilities for wellness and activity excursions. The hotel’s philosophy is to offer guests the full experience of the Dolomites, allowing them to recharge and clear their minds through hiking in the mountains, combined with relaxation in the spa and sauna facilities.

Hotel Cyprianerhof in South Tyrol Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Hotel Cyprianerhof in South Tyrol

In summer there is a programme of hiking as well as climbing and Via Ferrata, while in winter guests can try snow-shoe, ice climbing and cross-country ski. The hotel is affiliated to the Wanderhotels group of hiking hotels with hiking and snow-shoe excursions included as part of the half board package that includes breakfast, afternoon tea and evening meal. The food here was excellent using local and seasonal produce. Half board package including activities from €156 per person per night. You can check prices and book for all hotels in South Tyrol on HotelsCombined.

Kolnerhutte in South Tyrol Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Kolnerhutte in South Tyrol

Night 2 – KolnerHütte / Rifugio Fronza alle Coronelle Website: Rifugiofronza.com

Cost: from €52 per person for half board (evening meal and breakfast)

The Refuge has both 2 bed rooms and dorm rooms, with 60 beds in total. Blankets are provided but you need to bring your own sheet sleeping bag. There is 1 hot shower which costs €3 to use. The Refuge can also be reached from St Cyprian by a bus to the foot of the Laurino chairlift, then take the chairlift up to KolnerHütte. Many people use the chairlift to reach KolnerHütte quickly and then walk the higher mountain routes from there.

Rifugio Bergamo in South Tyrol Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Rifugio Bergamo in South Tyrol

Night 3 – Grasleitenhütte / Rifugio Bergamo Website: Grassleitenhuette.com

Cost: from €52 per person for half board (evening meal and breakfast)

We received a warm welcome at this family run Rifugio that was built in the last century as a base for wealthy mountain climbers and still has an authentic Tyrolian atmosphere with wood panelling, old pictures and maps. The Refuge has both 2 bed rooms and dorm rooms with duvets provided but you need to bring your own sheet sleeping bag. There are 2 hot showers which cost €3 to use. The refuge has a charming traditional feel and is family run with friendly owners and excellent cuisine and wine.

Our bedroom at Rifugio Bergamo Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Our bedroom at Rifugio Bergamo

Night 4 – Schlernhaus / Rifugio Bolzano Website: Schlernhaus.it

Cost: from €39 per person for 2 bed room including breakfast. Meals can be ordered from the modestly priced menu and half board is available for groups of 8+ people.

The Refuge has both 2 bed rooms and dorm rooms, with 120 beds in total. Duvets are provided but you need to bring your own sheet sleeping bag. There are no showers, only a washroom. The refuge is large with a traditional wood pannelled dining room and panoramic views of the mountains as well as friendly staff. The Refuge seemed to be a favourite with families and several people had dogs with them.

Rifugio Bolzano in South Tyrol Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Rifugio Bolzano in South Tyrol

Night 5 – Return to Hotel Cyprianerhof (see above)

Read about our our first day’s hike – Hiking in the Dolomites – a tour of the Rosengarten

Read about our second day’s hike – Over the pass in the Dolomites – hiking in South Tyrol

Getting to South Tyrol

South Tyrol is the north-east corner of Italy, bordering Austria to the north and Switzerland to the west. We flew to Venice Marco Polo Airport and hired a car to drive to the nearest village of St Cyprian, which took around 3 hours. Alternative airports would be Milan Bergamo (2 hrs 50 mins), Innsbruck (1 hr 50 mins), Verona (2 hrs), Venice Treviso (3 hrs). For those using public transport, trains and buses are available from most airports to Bozen/Bolzano and there is a bus (number 185) running from Bolzano to St Cyprian which stops ouside Hotel Cyprianerhof, running around once an hour (journey time 50 mins). The taxi from Bolzano to St Cyprian would take around 30 mins. To compare prices and book Hotels in South Tyrol check out HotelsCombined.

Speaking the language of South Tyrol

In South Tyrol both German and Italian are widely spoken, since the province was part of the Austro-Hungarian empire until 1948, then became part of Italy after WWI.  In the Dolomites we found that German was more commonly used although most locals will easily switch between Italian and German. English is less widely spoken although you will not have a problem in larger hotels and in mountain huts there is generally someone with a little English. Because of the dual languages all towns, villages and mountain huts have two names – both German and Italian. For simplicity in this article I may use just one of the names.

Hiking in South Tyrol

Hiking in South Tyrol

Plan your hiking routes in the Dolomites

A good resource for planning your hiking routes in the Dolomites is the Sentres.com website and the South Tyrol Tourism website also has plenty of information to plan your holiday in South Tyrol.

You will find timings for walking routes on the Sentres website. However, be aware that these are times for fit walkers without any stops for rests or photographs. In our experience we found that for each 2-3 hours of the ‘official’ time, we needed to add 30 mins to allow for being less fit and 30 mins for a drink stop in a refuge. So overall we would add 1-2 hours to the times given per day.

We used the Tappeiner 1:25.000 Map No 29 Schlern – Rosengarten – Sciliar – Catinaccio – Latemar – you can order it on Amazon and a similar map was for sale at Cyprianerhof for €9 and probably other places locally. We could not find an English guidebook to the routes we were walking but we found we could navigate fine with just a map as the paths were well marked.

Hiking in the Dolomites South Tyrol

Hiking in the Dolomites South Tyrol

Here are the routes and timings we took

Day 1 – Cyprianerhof to KolnerHütte

  • Official time: 4 hours
  • Actual time without stops: 4 hrs 30 mins
  • Actual time with stops: 6 hours
  • Our route was: Cyprianerhof – Nigerhütte 2 hrs / Nigerhütte – Messnerjoch hütte 1 hr / Messnerjoch hütte – KolnerHütte 1 hr 30 mins

Read about our Day 1 hike – Hiking in the Dolomites – a tour of the Rosengarten

Day 2 – KolnerHütte to Grasleitenhütte

  • Official time: 5 hrs 30 mins
  • Actual time without stops: 6 hrs
  • Actual time with stops: 7 hrs 30 mins
  • Our route was: KolnerHütte – top of Coronelle Pass 1 hr / top of Coronelle Pass – Rif. Vaiolet 1 hr 45 mins / Rif. Vaiolet – Grasleitenpasse 1 hr 30 mins / Grasleitenpasse – Grasseleitenhutte 1 hr 30 mins Warning: very steep climbing with cables over Coronelle Pass

Read about our Day 2 hike – Over the pass in the Dolomites – hiking in South Tyrol

Day 3 – Grasleitenhütte to Schlernhaus

  • Official time: 4 hrs
  • Actual time without stops: 5 hrs
  • Actual time with stops: 7 hrs 30 mins ( we made a 40 min detour to Rif. Alpe di Tires)
  • Our route was: Grasleitenhütte – Rif. Alpe di Tires 3 hrs 25 mins / Rif. Alpe di Tires to cairn at start of plateau 1 hr 20 mins / Cairn at start of plateau to Schlernhaus 1 hr 30 mins. Warning: very steep climbing with cables on final part of route 3 up to Rif. Alpe di Tires

Day 4 – Schlernhaus to Cyprianerhof

  • Official time: 4 hrs 30 mins
  • Actual time without stops: 6 hrs
  • Actual time with stops: 8 hrs
  • Our route was: Schlernhaus – Junction of route 3 & 7 1 hr 50 mins / Junction of route 3 & 7 – Turning to route 7B 1 hr / Turning to route 7B – Tschafonhutte 1 hr / Tschafonhutte – Cyprianerhof 2 hr

You’ve just finished reading about Day 3 & 4 of our hike

Thanks to the South Tyrol Tourism board who hosted my walking tour of the Dolomites.

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This article is originally published at Heatheronhertravels.com – Read the original article here

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Over the pass in the Dolomites: Hiking in South Tyrol

October 13, 2016 by  
Filed under Europe, Leisure, featured, Italy, South Tyrol, Walking

Our first day of hiking in the Dolomites had been relatively easy, as we scaled the gentler slopes of the Rosengarten range in South Tyrol.  But Day 2 proved a lot more challenging, as we scrambled over the Coronelle pass and slithered down the treacherous scree slopes on the other side. Pushing on through a surreal lunar landscape, we finally arrived at our next mountain hut and enjoyed a well earned beer on the terrace, as the evening sun turned the mountains pink. Read about our first day’s hike – Hiking in the Dolomites – a tour of the Rosengarten

Hiking in the Dolomites

Our day begins at KolnerHütte

Our first night at KolnerHütte had been convivial, with a hearty supper in the cozy dining room, surrounded by Tyrolean decoration and red checked tablecloths. A plate of pasta followed by gammon and potatoes, then tirimasu was washed down with beer, before we retired early to our bunks in the 8 bedroom dorm. I can’t say it was the best night’s sleep ever – not being accustomed to sleeping so close to 6 middle aged Belgian men, who heartily wished each other good night, like a chorus from The Waltons.

Dining room at kolnerhutte in South Tyrol Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Dining room at kolnerhutte in South Tyrol

Yet here we were in the early morning with our rucksacks packed and poles at the ready. From the terrace of the Rifugio, I watched the grey silhouettes of mountain ranges, layer upon layer, with the pink glow of sunrise at their back. The air was cold as the sun gradually lit up the valleys below, a dense blanket of forest parting to reveal patches of lighter green with a sprinkling of houses.

Sunrise at Kolnerhutte in South Tyrol Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Sunrise at Kolnerhutte in South Tyrol

We climb over the Coronnelle Pass

I have to admit that I was nervous about the next section of the route. In order to avoid a two hour detour around the Rosengarten range, we had chosen the shorter but steeper route over the Coronnelle Pass. Immediately above the hut was a 20 metre section where we had to climb hand over foot, using the metal cables and footholds fixed in the rock. It reminded me of my very first Via Ferrata on a previous visit to South Tyrol, only this time we had no helmet, no harness and no karabiners to secure us against a missed footing or a tumble down the mountain.

 Climbing up the Coronelle Pass Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Climbing up the Coronelle Pass

After the initial section the path got marginally more secure, winding upwards through a rocky landscape, but I could see no way over the massif. Ahead appeared to be only a vertical rock face, which I prayed we wouldn’t need to climb. A turn in the path revealed a break through to the top, the way secured by wooden logs and more metal cables and toe holds. An hour of climbing and we suddenly emerged at the top of the pass with a whole vista of valleys and peaks spread in a panorama before us.

View from the Coronelle Pass

View from the Coronelle Pass

Resting a while on the seat, we had an eagle’s eye view of our next stopping point at Rifugio Vaiolet. Although it looked almost close enough to touch, it was another hour and a half of narrow paths and slippery shale before we reached the Rifugio and installed ourslves on the sunny terrace for a cool lemon soda.

Rifugio Vaiolet in South Tyrol Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Rifugio Vaiolet in South Tyrol

Into a rocky lunar landscape

From our viewpoint on the terrace, we could see what looked like a line of ants – people coming up from the valley where there must have been a point to be dropped off by bus or cable car. As we continued our hike above the refuge, the path broadened and we walked up through a craggy lunar landscape that was grey and barren with only the smallest patches of grass. The rocky peaks all around us had a pink hue which would turn even more rosy when lit by the setting sun. Their name of the Rosengarten comes from the rose garden owned according to legend, by King Laurin, king of the dwarfs who ruled over this kingdom of quartz.

Hiking in the Rosengarten Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Hiking in the Rosengarten

Lunch at Grasleitenpasse

Now I was wondering again which direction we would follow, as all I could see was a narrow trail high up above us leading towards another pass on our right. On the rock above we saw a flag and  turned the path to see the refuge of Grasleitenpasse hanging on the side of the mountain below it. We gratefully shrugged off our rucksacks, to settle on the wooden benches for lunch, although the air was cool at this altitude as we sat in the shade of the mountain.

Mountain huts in the Dolomites

Grasleitenpasse in the Dolomites

Despite the remote location, the food was excellent here and I ordered a hearty bowl of vegetable soup while my friend Julia enjoyed the cheesy polenta with ham and rocket salad. A helicopter circled overhead and then flew into the next valley, so that I wondered whether they had been sent to rescue someone. Some of the more remote refuges in the Dolomites can only be reached by walking or by helicopter for supplies and emergencies.

Lunch at Grasleitenpasse in South Tyrol Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Lunch at Grasleitenpasse in South Tyrol

From the Rifugio, the path continued downhill into a bowl in the mountains filled with rock and not a leaf or blade of grass to be seen. The scree was very slippery and we had to go carefully to avoid dislodging rocks into the path of walkers coming up the slope. Down the side of the mountains were rivers of scree left by rockfalls and jagged peaks above the moraine where a glacier must have passed through many millions of years ago.

Hiking through a lunar landscape in the Dolomites Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Hiking through a lunar landscape in the Dolomites

Arriving at Grasleitenhütte / Rifugio Bergamo

From the bowl in the mountains we came to an opening where we could just glimpse the green valley ahead of us. The path wound along the side of the mountain with a stream rushing between the grey rocks coloured by patches of sulphur yellow lichen. Before long we could spot our next refuge below us,  a large yellow building set at the head of the valley with a few cute goats grazing below it.

Hiking in the Dolomites Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Hiking in the Dolomites

We received a friendly welcome as we arrived at Rifugio Bergamo, which in the last century had served as a base for gentleman mountaineers. The dining room was very atmospheric, with wooden panelling and old climbing photographs, and we had a cute room of our own (sheer luxury!) with wooden beds and check duvets. Before supper we sat on the terrace basking in the last of the evening sun, with a beer among the boxes of bright red geraniums, and a glimpse of the valley where we would be heading the next day.

In my next article I’ll be writing about our walk to the next hut along a grassy plateau and our precipitous descent to the valley again for a welcome return to the lovely Hotel Cyprianerhof. If you are considering hiking in the Dolomites and have any questions please do leave them in the comments for me to answer.

Read about our previous day’s hike – Hiking in the Dolomites – a tour of the Rosengarten

Rifugio Bergamo in South Tyrol Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Rifugio Bergamo in South Tyrol

Where we stayed in South Tyrol

To compare prices and book Hotels in South Tyrol check out my hotels booking page powered by HotelsCombined

Night 1 – Hotel Cyprianerhof

Website: Cyprianerhof.com A luxurious 4 star hotel in St Cyprian with extensive facilities for wellness and activity excursions. The hotel’s philosophy is to offer guests the full experience of the Dolomites, allowing them to recharge and clear their minds through hiking in the mountains, combined with relaxation in the spa and sauna facilities.

Hotel Cyprianerhof in South Tyrol Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Hotel Cyprianerhof in South Tyrol

In summer there is a programme of hiking as well as climbing and Via Ferrata, while in winter guests can try snow-shoe, ice climbing and cross-country ski. The hotel is affiliated to the Wanderhotels group of hiking hotels with hiking and snow-shoe excursions included as part of the half board package that includes breakfast, afternoon tea and evening meal. The food here was excellent using local and seasonal produce. Half board package including activities from €156 per person per night

Kolnerhutte in South Tyrol Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Kolnerhutte in South Tyrol

Night 2 – KolnerHütte / Rifugio Fronza alle Coronelle Website: Rifugiofronza.com

Cost: from €52 per person for half board (evening meal and breakfast)

The Refuge has both 2 bed rooms and dorm rooms, with 60 beds in total. Blankets are provided but you need to bring your own sheet sleeping bag. There is 1 hot shower which costs €3 to use. The Refuge can also be reached from St Cyprian by a bus to the foot of the Laurino chairlift, then take the chairlift up to KolnerHütte. Many people use the chairlift to reach KolnerHütte quickly and then walk the higher mountain routes from there.

Inside Rifugio Bergamo in South Tyrol Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Inside Rifugio Bergamo in South Tyrol

Night 3 – Grasleitenhütte / Rifugio Bergamo Website: Grassleitenhuette.com

Cost: from €52 per person for half board (evening meal and breakfast)

We received a warm welcome at this family run Rifugio that was built in the last century as a base for wealthy mountain climbers and still has an authentic Tyrolian atmosphere with wood panelling, old pictures and maps. The Refuge has both 2 bed rooms and dorm rooms with duvets provided but you need to bring your own sheet sleeping bag. There are 2 hot showers which cost €3 to use. The refuge has a charming traditional feel and is family run with friendly owners and excellent cuisine and wine.

Our bedroom at Rifugio Bergamo Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Our bedroom at Rifugio Bergamo

Night 4 – Schlernhaus / Rifugio Bolzano Website: Schlernhaus.it

Cost: from €39 per person for 2 bed room including breakfast. Meals can be ordered from the modestly priced menu and half board is available for groups of 8+ people.

The Refuge has both 2 bed rooms and dorm rooms, with 120 beds in total. Duvets are provided but you need to bring your own sheet sleeping bag. There are no showers, only a washroom. The refuge is large with a traditional wood pannelled dining room and panoramic views of the mountains as well as friendly staff. The Refuge seemed to be a favourite with families and several people had dogs with them.

Rifugio Bolzano in South Tyrol Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Rifugio Bolzano in South Tyrol

Night 5 – Return to Hotel Cyprianerhof (see above)

Read about our previous day’s hike – Hiking in the Dolomites – a tour of the Rosengarten

Getting to South Tyrol

South Tyrol is the north-east corner of Italy, bordering Austria to the north and Switzerland to the west. We flew to Venice Marco Polo Airport and hired a car to drive to the nearest village of St Cyprian, which took around 3 hours. Alternative airports would be Milan Bergamo (2 hrs 50 mins), Innsbruck (1 hr 50 mins), Verona (2 hrs), Venice Treviso (3 hrs). For those using public transport, trains and buses are available from most airports to Bozen/Bolzano and there is a bus (number 185) running from Bolzano to St Cyprian which stops ouside Hotel Cyprianerhof, running around once an hour (journey time 50 mins). The taxi from Bolzano to St Cyprian would take around 30 mins. To compare prices and book Hotels in South Tyrol check out my hotels booking page powered by HotelsCombined

What language are we speaking?

In South Tyrol both German and Italian are widely spoken, since the province was part of the Austro-Hungarian empire until 1948, then became part of Italy after WWI.  In the Dolomites we found that German was more commonly used although most locals will easily switch between Italian and German. English is less widely spoken although you will not have a problem in larger hotels and in mountain huts there is generally someone with a little English. Because of the dual languages all towns, villages and mountain huts have two names – both German and Italian. For simplicity in this article I may use just one of the names.

Plan your hiking routes

A good resource for planning your hiking routes in the Dolomites is the Sentres.com website and the South Tyrol Tourism website also has plenty of information to plan your holiday in South Tyrol.

You will find timings for walking routes on the Sentres website. However, be aware that these are times for fit walkers without any stops for rests or photographs. In our experience we found that for each 2-3 hours of the ‘official’ time, we needed to add 30 mins to allow for being less fit and 30 mins for a drink stop in a refuge. So overall we would add 1-2 hours to the times given per day.

We used the Tappeiner 1:25.000 Map No 29 Schlern – Rosengarten – Sciliar – Catinaccio – Latemar – you can order it on Amazon and a similar map was for sale at Cyprianerhof for €9 and probably other places locally. We could not find an English guidebook to the routes we were walking but we found we could navigate fine with just a map as the paths were well marked.

Hiking in the Rosengarten Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Hiking in the Rosengarten

Here are the routes and timings we took

Day 1 – Cyprianerhof to KolnerHütte

  • Official time: 4 hours
  • Actual time without stops: 4 hrs 30 mins
  • Actual time with stops: 6 hours
  • Our route was: Cyprianerhof – Nigerhütte 2 hrs / Nigerhütte – Messnerjoch hütte 1 hr / Messnerjoch hütte – KolnerHütte 1 hr 30 mins

Read about our Day 1 hike – Hiking in the Dolomites – a tour of the Rosengarten

Day 2 – KolnerHütte to Grasleitenhütte

  • Official time: 5 hrs 30 mins
  • Actual time without stops: 6 hrs
  • Actual time with stops: 7 hrs 30 mins
  • Our route was: KolnerHütte – top of Coronelle Pass 1 hr / top of Coronelle Pass – Rif. Vaiolet 1 hr 45 mins / Rif. Vaiolet – Grasleitenpasse 1 hr 30 mins / Grasleitenpasse – Grasseleitenhutte 1 hr 30 mins Warning: very steep climbing with cables over Coronelle Pass

Day 3 – Grasleitenhütte to Schlernhaus

  • Official time: 4 hrs
  • Actual time without stops: 5 hrs
  • Actual time with stops: 7 hrs 30 mins ( we made a 40 min detour to Rif. Alpe di Tires)
  • Our route was: Grasleitenhütte – Rif. Alpe di Tires 3 hrs 25 mins / Rif. Alpe di Tires to cairn at start of plateau 1 hr 20 mins / Cairn at start of plateau to Schlernhaus 1 hr 30 mins. Warning: very steep climbing with cables on final part of route 3 up to Rif. Alpe di Tires

Day 4 – Schlernhaus to Cyprianerhof

  • Official time: 4 hrs 30 mins
  • Actual time without stops: 6 hrs
  • Actual time with stops: 8 hrs
  • Our route was: Schlernhaus – Junction of route 3 & 7 1 hr 50 mins / Junction of route 3 & 7 – Turning to route 7B 1 hr / Turning to route 7B – Tschafonhutte 1 hr / Tschafonhutte – Cyprianerhof 2 hr

Thanks to the South Tyrol Tourism board who hosted my walking tour of the Dolomites.

Hiking in the Dolomites Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Hiking in the Dolomites

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Read about hiking over the pass in the Dolomites - South Tyrol

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Hiking in the Dolomites – a tour of the Rosengarten in South Tyrol

Every year my friend Julia and I set off for a hiking holiday, a girl’s own adventure in which we test ourselves on the mountain trails of Europe. This year we had chosen the Dolomites of South Tyrol in Northern Italy as our outdoor playground, making a circular route around the Rosengarten or Catinaccio range.

Read about Hiking in the Dolomites

Our start and end point was the gorgeous Hotel Cyprianerhof, a stylish hotel that offers an extensive programme of hiking activities, combined with spa and wellness, to its guests. Our two nights at Cyprianerhof provided a luxurious contrast with the three nights that we would be staying in simple mountain huts with fabulous views but basic facilities. You can read more about our stay at Hotel Cyprianerhof at the end of this article, but in the meantime, let’s get started on our four day hike around the Dolomites.

Climbing up to Nigerhutte Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Climbing up to Nigerhutte

Leaving Hotel Cyprianerhof, we walked up a broad gravel path, past enormous wood piles set by the stream, until the track veered up unto the forest. The trail was shady and damp underfoot with toadstools peeping through the foliage beside the path. Down to our left was a steep gully where we could hear the trickling of a stream and although the sun filtered through the trees, we were pleased to be walking in the cooler shade.

Toadstool in South Tyrol

Toadstool in South Tyrol

A broad gravel track was running in the same direction as the forest path that we took, which twisted and turned, crossing the broader track every so often. A group of mountainbikers from the hotel were riding up the gravel track and every so often one would pass us, cycling steadily up the steep slope with seemingly iron leg muscles. We walked past them again as they all gathered for a rest on one of the bends but were sure that we’d much rather be hiking than cycling up that slope. As we climbed and the trees thinned, we could just glimpse the grey rocky crags of the Dolomites in between the trees, framed by the blue sky.

Nigerhutte in South Tyrol Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Nigerhutte in South Tyrol

After two hours of hiking up the forest path we were certainly ready for a break as NigerHutte came into view on the rise high above us, a pretty wooden building with blooming window boxes and cheerful blue sun umbrellas. The cyclists were already there enjoying a coffee and we gratefully sat at the benches and tables on the terrace and ordered a cooling lemon soda, which became our drink of choice on all our hiking stops. As the road came up to this point, the car park was full and it seemed a popular spot with motorbikers. The road continued further to the bottom of the cable car up to Kolnerhutte where we were heading that evening. Read about Day 2 of our hike Over the Pass in the Dolomites.

Windowbox at Nigerhutte

Windowbox at Nigerhutte

Our route continued not on the road but on the easy forest track again until the vista opened up into a grassy meadow, with the smell of freshly mown grass in the air. At the top of the meadow was what looked like a farm house, a tractor parked beside it and a small enclosure of cows beside the path. Befind it we now had a clear view of the grey rocky crags of the Dolomites, rising sheer from the green patches of forest.

Climbing up to the Dolomites Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Climbing up to the Dolomites

Getting closer I realised that this was the Rifugio Messner Joch with a sunny terrace cafe where I found my friend Julia already settled, enjoying the view back down the valley. We decided that this was a good place to stop for lunch and ordered more drinks and a bowl of hearty vegetable soup, spotting the cyclists once again at the next table tucking into a plate of the local Kaiserschmarrn pancakes, with redcurrant jam.

Lunch at Messenerjoch in South Tyrol Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Lunch at Messenerjoch in South Tyrol

Leaving the hut, the path wound up through the meadow where cows were grazing, and I stayed close to my friend Julia who was afraid of cows having been chased by one as a child. Above us we could see Kolnerhutte with the line of the cable cars leading up to it. What a shame that we couldn’t hitch a lift on one of them as we trudged up the track, the scenery becoming more panoramic as we increased in altitude. Kolnerhutte sat above us just at the foot of the rocky crags that we would have to climb over the next day and below us were the gently rolling pastures dotted with houses.

Climbing up to Kolnerhutte

Climbing up to Kolnerhutte

One lesson we quickly learned on this trip was that the mountain huts can often be seen clearly long before you reach them, appearing tantalisingly close, but in fact requiring an hour or more to reach on steep and twisting paths. By the time we reached the top at Kolnerhutte it was late afternoon and we were pleased to settle in for the night. Read about Day 2 of our hike – Over the pass in the Dolomites of South Tyrol.

Kolnerhutte in South Tyrol Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Kolnerhutte in South Tyrol

Above the cable car station was a busy cafe terrace but we were staying in the separate building above it, with a cosy wooden dining room decorated with old climbing memorabilia, red checked table cloths and pretty fake flower arrangements. As was traditional for the Tyrol, both the Austrian and Italian side, a large crucifix was mounted on the wall. We left our boots on the racks at the bottom of the stairs, borrowed some plastic clogs and were pointed to our eight person dorm which we were sharing with a hearty group of Belgian men and a younger couple. As we’d come to expect in these remote mountain huts, the washing facilities were limited and we joined the queue for the single shower, operated by a €3 token to ensure you only used your allocated amount of hot water.

Dining room at Kolnerhutte in South Tyrol Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Dining room at Kolnerhutte in South Tyrol

Dinner was served at around 6.30, the typical half board offering of a plate of pasta, followed by a dish of meat and potatoes, then tirimasu for desert, washed down with beer or wine. From our table I could watch the sun turning the mountain golden and longed to rush out and take photos, but by the time supper was over the rock face was in grey shadow. Knowing that we would have an early start and long walk tomorrow we turned in after dinner for an early night. With all the comings and goings in the dorm neither of us slept especially well and were up early for our breakfast of bread and jam, with a simple spread of ham, cheese and cornflakes with hot coffee. The next day of our hike would take us steeply up over the rocky Coronelle Pass, so we would need all our concentration and energy for the tricky climb. In my next article you’ll hear how we fared on the precipitous rock face up to the pass! Read about Day 2 of our hike – Over the pass in the Dolomites of South Tyrol

Sunset in South Tyrol at Kolnerhutte

Sunset in South Tyrol at Kolnerhutte

Staying at Cyprianerhof in South Tyrol

I promised you I’d tell you a bit more about Cyprianerhof and I can’t praise this hotel highly enough as it provided us with a wonderful start and end to our hiking tour. I really was tempted to just abandon all the hiking plans and just stay here for the week! Owner Martin Damian told me how he had taken the hotel over from his parents who established it in the 1960s and had developed it gradually since 1985 together with his wife who is responsible for all the interior design.

Hotel Cyprianerhof in South Tyrol Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Hotel Cyprianerhof in South Tyrol

The hotel’s philosophy is to offer guests the full experience of the Dolomites, allowing them to recharge and clear their minds through hiking in the mountains, combined with relaxation in the spa and sauna facilities. In summer there is a programme of hiking as well as climbing and Via Ferrata, while in winter guests can try snow-shoe, ice climbing and cross-country ski. The hotel is affiliated to the Wanderhotels group of hiking hotels with hiking and snow-shoe excursions included as part of the half board package.

Dinner at Hotel Cyprianerhof Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Dinner at Hotel Cyprianerhof

Most guests come for a week or more because they love the luxurious ambiance and hotel facilities combined with the challenging hiking in the Dolomites. You can borrow everything you need from the hotel – rucksacks, poles, water bottles, even climbing harnesses if you need them.

Bar at Hotel Cyprianerhof Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Bar at Hotel Cyprianerhof

We loved the stylish decor combining wood and glass, a modern take on the Tyrolean theme with knotted spruce and local stone in the bedrooms, cosy woollen checks and views of the mountains. As South Tyrol is a big producer of apples, there were big baskets of apples everywhere and an apple on the pillow as a healthy alternative to the usual chocolate. The mattresses were so comfortable and the duvets so soft that I felt I could float away on them when we arrived and collapsed after our hut-to-hut tour.

Bedroom at Hotel Cyprianerhof in South Tyrol Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Bedroom at Hotel Cyprianerhof in South Tyrol

The food at Cyprianerhof was exceptional with a breakfast spread that was as varied and healthy as I’ve ever seen. In addition to the usual muesli, yoghurts, pastries and fruits there were whole sections devoted to butter and soft cheese, fresh fruits, herbal teas, local cheese and machines to make yourself fresh pressed orange juice or raw vegetable juices. At dinner there was a 4 course set menu with different choices which was beautifully presented as well as delicious. The staff were also exceptional – friendly, professional and switching effortlessly between languages – they smilingly welcomed us on arrival with a shake of the hand.

Healthy options at Hotel Cyprianerhof Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Healthy options at Hotel Cyprianerhof

In the bar area was plenty of comfortable seating to chat and relax with friends over an Aperol Spritz or Hugo and the natural textures or wood and stone were lit with flashes of pink, purple and green light around the bar. The same coloured light was used to light the swimming pool blue at night-time with loungers to relax after your spa treatment with a view of the mountains. The daily programme also included a range of different sauna experiences, with honey and herbal infusions in the Schupfensauna and the opportunity to go as hot as you could stand.

Relaxation area at Hotel Cyprianerhof in South Tyrol Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Relaxation area at Hotel Cyprianerhof in South Tyrol

I’d highly recommend Cyprianerhof as the perfect place to relax at the beginning and end of your hut-to-hut tour. If you don’t fancy the somewhat basic basic hut accommodation up in the mountains then I’d just base yourself at Cyprianerhof and take advantage of the guided hikes that are included in the package and can be just as physically challenging as anything we did.

Aperitivo time at Hotel Cyprianerhof

Aperitivo time at Hotel Cyprianerhof

If you’ve enjoyed this article, read the next in the series from Day 2 of our hike – Over the Pass in the Dolomites

Getting to South Tyrol

South Tyrol is the north-east corner of Italy, bordering Austria to the north and Switzerland to the west. We flew to Venice Marco Polo Airport and hired a car to drive to the nearest village of St Cyprian, which took around 3 hours. Alternative airports would be Milan Bergamo (2 hrs 50 mins), Innsbruck (1 hr 50 mins), Verona (2 hrs), Venice Treviso (3 hrs). For those using public transport, trains and buses are available from most airports to Bolzano and there is a bus (no 185) running from Bolzano to St Cyprian which stops ouside Hotel Cyprianerhof, running around once an hour (journey time 50 mins). The taxi from Bolzano to St Cyprian would take around 30 mins. To compare prices and book Hotels in South Tyrol check out my hotels booking page powered by HotelsCombined

Are we really in Italy?

In South Tyrol both German and Italian are widely spoken, since the province was part of the Austro-Hungarian empire until 1948, when it was annexed by Italy after WWI.  In the Dolomites we found that German was more commonly used although most locals will easily switch between Italian and German. English is less widely spoken although you will not have a problem in larger hotels and in mountain huts there is generally someone with a little English. Because of the dual languages all towns, villages and mountain huts have two names – both German and Italian. I will mention both but for simplicity may then use just one.

Mountain huts in the Dolomites

Mountain huts in the Dolomites

Read about Day 2 of our hike as we head over the pass in the Dolomites, South Tyrol

Where we stayed

To compare prices and book Hotels in South Tyrol check out my hotels booking page powered by HotelsCombined

Night 1 – Hotel Cyprianerhof Website: Cyprianerhof.com A luxurious 4 star hotel in St Cyprian with extensive facilities for wellness and activity excursions. Guests normally stay on a half board package that includes breakfast, afternoon tea and evening meal, with hiking or snowshoe tours for all abilities. The food here was excellent using local and seasonal produce. Half board package including activities from €156 per person per night

Night 2 – KolnerHütte / Rifugio Fronza alle Coronelle Website: Rifugiofronza.com

Cost: from €52 per person for half board (evening meal and breakfast)

The Refuge has both 2 bed rooms and dorm rooms, with 60 beds in total. Blankets are provided but you need to bring your own sheet sleeping bag. There is 1 hot shower which costs €3 to use. The Refuge can also be reached from St Cyprian by a bus to the foot of the Laurino chairlift, then take the chairlift up to KolnerHütte. Many people use the chairlift to reach KolnerHütte quickly and then walk the higher mountain routes from there.

Night 3 – Grasleitenhütte / Rifugio Bergamo Website: Grassleitenhuette.com

Cost: from €52 per person for half board (evening meal and breakfast)

The Refuge has both 2 bed rooms and dorm rooms with duvets provided but you need to bring your own sheet sleeping bag. There are 2 hot showers which cost €3 to use. The refuge has a charming traditional feel and is family run with friendly owners and excellent cuisine and wine.

Night 4 – Schlernhaus / Rifugio Bolzano Website: Schlernhaus.it

Cost: from €39 per person for 2 bed room including breakfast. Meals can be ordered from the modestly priced menu and half board is available for groups of 8+ people.

The Refuge has both 2 bed rooms and dorm rooms, with 120 beds in total. Duvets are provided but you need to bring your own sheet sleeping bag. There are no showers, only a washroom. The refuge is large with a traditional wood pannelled dining room and panoramic views of the mountains as well as friendly staff. The Refuge seemed to be a favourite with families and several people had dogs with them.

Night 5 – Hotel Cyprianerhof (see above)

Planning your hiking routes in the Dolomites

Planning your hiking routes in the Dolomites

Planning your hiking routes

A good resource for planning your hiking routes in the Dolomites is the Sentres.com website and the South Tyrol Tourism website also has plenty of information to plan your holiday in South Tyrol.

You will find timings for walking routes on the Sentres website. However, be aware that these are times for fit walkers without any stops for rests or photographs. In our experience we found that for each 2-3 hours of the ‘official’ time, we needed to add 30 mins to allow for being less fit and 30 mins for a drink stop in a refuge. So overall we would add 1-2 hours to the times given per day.

We used the Tappeiner 1:25.000 Map No 29 Schlern – Rosengarten – Sciliar – Catinaccio – Latemar – you can order it on Amazon and a similar map was for sale at Cyprianerhof for €9 and probably other places locally. We could not find an English guidebook to the routes we were walking but we found we could navigate fine with just a map as the paths were well marked.

Hiking in the Dolomites

Hiking in the Dolomites

Here are the routes and timings we took

Day 1 – Cyprianerhof to KolnerHütte

  • Official time: 4 hours
  • Actual time without stops: 4 hrs 30 mins
  • Actual time with stops: 6 hours
  • Our route was: Cyprianerhof – Nigerhütte 2 hrs / Nigerhütte – Messnerjoch hütte 1 hr / Messnerjoch hütte – KolnerHütte 1 hr 30 mins

Day 2 – KolnerHütte to Grasleitenhütte

  • Official time: 5 hrs 30 mins
  • Actual time without stops: 6 hrs
  • Actual time with stops: 7 hrs 30 mins
  • Our route was: KolnerHütte – top of Coronelle Pass 1 hr / top of Coronelle Pass – Rif. Vaiolet 1 hr 45 mins / Rif. Vaiolet – Grasleitenpasse 1 hr 30 mins / Grasleitenpasse – Grasseleitenhutte 1 hr 30 mins Warning: very steep climbing with cables over Coronelle Pass

Read about Day 2 – Over the pass in the Dolomites

Day 3 – Grasleitenhütte to Schlernhaus

  • Official time: 4 hrs
  • Actual time without stops: 5 hrs
  • Actual time with stops: 7 hrs 30 mins ( we made a 40 min detour to Rif. Alpe di Tires)
  • Our route was: Grasleitenhütte – Rif. Alpe di Tires 3 hrs 25 mins / Rif. Alpe di Tires to cairn at start of plateau 1 hr 20 mins / Cairn at start of plateau to Schlernhaus 1 hr 30 mins. Warning: very steep climbing with cables on final part of route 3 up to Rif. Alpe di Tires

Day 4 – Schlernhaus to Cyprianerhof

  • Official time: 4 hrs 30 mins
  • Actual time without stops: 6 hrs
  • Actual time with stops: 8 hrs
  • Our route was: Schlernhaus – Junction of route 3 & 7 1 hr 50 mins / Junction of route 3 & 7 – Turning to route 7B 1 hr / Turning to route 7B – Tschafonhutte 1 hr / Tschafonhutte – Cyprianerhof 2 hr
Sunset in the Dolomites

Sunset in the Dolomites

Thanks to the South Tyrol Tourism board who hosted my walking tour of the Dolomites.

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Read about hiking in the Dolomites

This article is originally published at Heatheronhertravels.com – Read the original article here

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You’ll also find our sister blog with tips on how to build a successful travel blog at My Blogging Journey

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