A high mountain walk (and a tumble) in the Gaistal Valley, Austria

September 2, 2015 by  
Filed under Austria, Europe, featured, Leisure, Walking

It’s become an annual ritual for my friend Julia and I to take off for a few days in early September for some hiking in the mountains. Over four years we walked the Tour de Mont Blanc and revelled in the high mountain passes and physical challenge. Last year our walk in the Serra de Tramuntana of Mallorca was beautiful but just a little tame. Perhaps a few days hiking with Headwater Holidays in the Tirol region of Austria would give us the chance to test ourselves in the mountains while returning to a comfortable hotel each night and not a bunk bed in sight.

Heather and Julia set off from Hotel Xander in Austria Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Heather and Julia set off from Hotel Xander in Austria

For our first day’s walk we decided on the Gaistal Valley since it could be easily reached direct from the hotel and promised some great views without too many extremes of altitude. As we left Hotel Xander the sun was already warm, the path meandering through the traditional houses in the hamlet of Kirchplatzl. We felt the order of this Tyrolean community in the well-kept houses, each with a painted name and vibrant flowering window boxes bursting with the energy of the mountain air and copious amounts of plant feed.

Walking through Kirchplatzl in Tirol, Austria Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Walking through Kirchplatzl in Tirol, Austria

The gravel track wound gradually upwards through forest with occasional gaps in the trees where we could see a field of horses or piles of freshly mown clover that would be dried for winter fodder. With a forecast of several days of sunshine ahead of us, the farmers were literally making hay while the sun shines.

Walking into the Gaistal Valley, Tirol, Austria Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Walking into the Gaistal Valley, Tirol, Austria

As the track curved upwards we could hear the sound of rushing water and found a bench to overlook the Klammbach Gorge where the mountain river was tumbling over the rocks below us. We left the gravel track on a much steeper climb, picking our way over the forest roots on the path. The sunlight was dappled through the pines with lush grass speckled with blue cornflowers and baby pines trees pushing up to make the next generation of forest.

Walking through forest in the Gaistal Valley, Tirol, Austria Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Walking through forest in the Gaistal Valley, Tirol, Austria

Finally at the top of the forest trail we reached the Wettersteinhutte, a mountain hut with a terrace overlooking the valley below. Red geraniums and hanging baskets were blooming in every corner and cheerful red sun umbrellas completed the inviting scene. We took a seat by the balcony and ordered a couple of the beers from the crates that were cooling in the water trough.

Walking to Wettersteinhutte in the Gaistal Valley, Tirol, Austria Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Walking to Wettersteinhutte in the Gaistal Valley, Tirol, Austria

The Gaistal Valley is well known for the many huts that serve the thirsty walker, serving wholesome and hearty fare using local cheese, sausages and other mountain produce. We were hoping to continue up the valley to discover some other huts that we had been recommended for lunch, especially the Tillfussalm hut that we heard made cheese and dairy produce that they served in their cafe.

Wettersteinhutte in the Gaistal Valley, Tirol, Austria Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Wettersteinhutte in the Gaistal Valley, Tirol, Austria

Unfortunately we never made it to any other huts, since it was soon after we left the Wettersteinhutte that I took a tumble. Julia was well ahead of me due to my habit of stopping every few minutes to take photos. The path was flat but narrow and open to one side with a steep grassy slope below. Somehow I missed my footing on the side of the path, over balanced and rolled down the slope a few times until I managed to stop myself. I sat for a while in shock, trying to assess the damage and realised that my right ankle had been twisted quite badly, although thankfully nothing seemed to be broken.

Walking in the Gaistal Valley, Austria Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Soon after this I took a tumble and twisted my ankle

For a while I shouted constantly, calling Julia’s name, but she was too far down the path and couldn’t hear me. No other walkers came along the path above me. Cautiously I inched my bottom up the slope and little by little made it back up to the path. Thankfully I could walk on my ankle and hobbled along for another 10 minutes until I found Julia waiting for me. We assessed the situation and I took some of the painkillers I had in my small medical kit while Julia found a stout stick from the forest to help me walk. As we followed the path back down to the valley I reflected on the lessons I should learn from this tumble;

  1. I normally use walking poles on these mountain walks but had left them in the hotel, a mistake I won’t make again since I feel sure I wouldn’t have lost my footing with them.
  2. My husband always keeps a small whistle attached to his walking rucksack for attracting attention in an emergency – just the kind of emergency that there would been had my ankle been broken rather than just twisted.
  3. After the tumble Julia and I decided to make a rule that we should stay within sight or at least shouting distance of one another.

Luckily there was no major harm done and we were passed by an elderly German couple who seeing the wooden staff told me “These poles are much better for your knees and legs!” Yes, I think I had learned that lesson now!

Walking down through the Gaistal Valley in Austria Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Walking down through the Gaistal Valley in Austria

Our plans for visiting the huts further down the valley that we’d been told were great for lunch had to be abandoned, since it was now a case of getting down the mountain and assessing the damage. Already I  knew we’d have to move from the more advanced ‘2 boot’ walks to the more gentle ‘1 boot’ walks in the Headwater Holidays walking guides.

Walking by the river in the Gaistal Valley, Austria Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Walking by the river in the Gaistal Valley, Austria

Arriving at the Salzbach car park, we followed the flat path that is also used by cyclists along the valley floor. The river was low, exposing the grey boulders with places where you could swim in the milky blue water. We crossed a bridge and looking up could see a small cave high up in the rockface with a crucifix and life sized religious figures, with a shrine to St Joseph on the road below it.

St Joseph's shrine in the Gaistal Valley Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

St Joseph’s shrine in the Gaistal Valley

As the valley widened out we reached the first village of Klamm and crossed the bridge to look for the farm shop that had been recommended to us. Gut Leutasch, we were told, was the place to buy cured sausages and pâté which were supplied to many of the restaurants in the area as well as local honey and fruit flavoured kirsch. Had it been lunchtime we could have sat at the table with a cup of coffee and a fresh bread roll filled with some of the cold meats or sausages of our choice.

Farm shop of Gut Leutasch at Klamm in the Gaistal Valley, Austria Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Farm shop of Gut Leutasch at Klamm in the Gaistal Valley, Austria

The path now took us across the meadows backed by the mountain slopes rising behind. This was truly the Alpine scene that is the image of rural Austria, with the fields of clover uncut in some places, in others with hay drying in neat rows and in places the fat, white plastic-covered bales of hay neatly stacked at the side of the field.

Walking back to Leutasch through the meadows Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Walking back to Leutasch through the meadows

As we passed the neat houses with playful scarecrows sitting next to a clump of sunflowers, I thought what a wonderful place it was to bring up a family in the mountains with so much open space and fresh air. Isn’t one of the fun things about being on holiday to imagine what it would be like to live somewhere else? Another half an hour and we were back at Hotel Xander, where I could rest my leg and we could plan a walking adventure for the next day that my ankle could manage.

Coming Soon – Day 2 in which we take the chair lift high above Seefeld to reach the cross at Seefelder Stitze

Back at Hotel Xander in Leutasch, Austria Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Back at Hotel Xander in Leutasch, Austria

Want to go walking in Austria’s Leutasch Valley?

Heather’s walking holiday in Austria’s Leutasch Valley was provided by Headwater Holidays – find out more about this holiday here. This 7 night walking holiday is based in Kirchplaztl at the 4 star Hotel Xander with over 450km of walking trails accessible direct from the hotel or via local bus, taxi and lifts. The holiday includes a full programme of self-guided day walks of 1 boot or 2 boot levels, depending on whether you prefer the gentle valley walks or the more challenging high altitude trails which are sometimes accessed via chair lifts and cable cars. The holiday includes detailed walking guides and maps, breakfast and dinner at the hotel, a packed lunch on walking days and flights/ transfers via Innsbruck. Prices from £669 per person.

Headwater Holidays are a leading UK specialist in self-guided walking, cycling and relaxed activity holidays that allow you to travel at your own pace and get closer to the places you visit. For more information check their Website | Facebook | Twitter | Google+ | Youtube | Pinterest | Instagram

More things to do in the Tirol region of Austria

For more information on things to do in the Tirol region of Austria visit the Tirol tourism website and follow their social media channels: Blog | Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Pinterest. More information about things to do in Austria on the Visit Austria Website.

How to get to Leutasch Valley, Austria

Heather flew from Bristol to Munich with BMI Regional who fly 12 times each week on this route, so you often have a choice of 2 flights per day. The ticket includes 20kg checked baggage and full at-seat in-flight bar and snack service at no extra charge.

Transfers from Innsbruck airport are less than 1 hour’s drive to Leutach and included in your Headwater Holidays package. If, like us you fly into Munich Airport, the transfer to Leutasch Valley takes around 2 hours and can be arranged through your hotel or holiday provider.

Hotel Xander in Leutasch, Austria Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Hotel Xander in Leutasch, Austria

Stay at Sporthotel Xander in Leutasch

Heather stayed at Sporthotel Xander in Leutasch as part of the walking holiday booked through Headwater Holidays. The hotel is  a very comfortable 4 star hotel offering rooms, suites and apartments that are ideal for summer walkers or winter cross-country skiers. The other guests when we stayed at the end of August were mainly couples and a few families enjoying a late summer walking break. The hotel is used by several walking companies including Headwater Holidays.

Hotel Xander in Leutasch, Austria Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Hotel Xander in Leutasch, Austria

We stayed on a full board basis, with breakfast, packed lunch and evening meal and found the food to be of a very high standard with a 4 course meal every night and a 5 course gala meal on one of the nights we were there. The hotel has an indoor pool and spa although we did not use them since we were out all day walking and making the most of the fine weather. The hamlet of Kirchplatzl where the hotel is situated is mainly residential and the nearest shops are a 15 minute walk away in Weidach. The bus to Seefeld which runs several times a day stops right by the hotel.

We think Hotel Xander is a comfortable, traditional hotel that will suit keen walkers who want a quiet and relaxing atmosphere. If you are looking for a lively atmosphere, shopping or evening entertainment then you might be better to stay in Seefeld. Check prices and book your stay here.

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Read about hiking in the Gaistal Valley, Austria with Headwater Holidays

Thanks to Headwater Holidays who hosted Heather’s walking holiday and to BMI regional who provided Heather’s flight to Munich.

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How not to eat badly in Venice

There’s a saying that if you eat badly in Italy you must be in Venice. Being something of a foodie myself, on my long weekend in Venice, I was determined to search out the best of Venetian food. I’m afraid to report, however, that my food experiences ranged from the average to the mediocre. Since Venice is such a tourist hotspot, and so many of the visitors are there for such a short time, it is all too easy for many businesses not to try too hard. Still with a little research and planning I think that you can find the best that Venice has to offer, so here are my tips to ensure that you don’t eat too badly in Venice.

Get well away from San Marco

The San Marco district and especially the area around St Mark’s Square is the tourist hub of Venice and is always packed with visitors. Many come for the day from a cruise ship or coach tour and just have time for the tick list sights of the Doge’s palace, San Marco Cathedral, climb the campenile and then a quick gondola tour or foray to the Rialto Bridge. I’m not saying it’s not possible to find a good restaurant in this area, but you are just as likely to stumble into one with a multi-lingual menu designed to service tourists only.

Seafood Pasta in Venice Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Seafood Pasta in Venice

Better to venture into the less touristy districts such as Cannaregio, Arsenale or Dorsoduro where you will find more authentic wine bars and restaurants. The area around the Rialto market is good and has a number of good bacari (wine bars) plus it’s a feast for the eyes. Arrive in the morning when the fish is on sale to see the market in full flow; by lunchtime the market is winding down and stalls are packing up, although the fruit and veg stalls will be there for a little longer.

Linguine alle Vongole in Venice Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Linguine alle Vongole in Venice

What to eat in Venice

If you’re not sure what to order we found that it was difficult to go wrong with a seafood pasta or pizza. It’s not terribly adventurous but tends to be the least expensive things on the menu if you’re on a budget. Local specialities to look out for are linguine alle vongole, the hot antipasti of mussels and clams and a risotto with black squid ink. The meat dishes that we eat at home such as lasagne and ravioli we found were disappointing.

If you are offered fresh fish, it may be priced by weight and you should take care to establish the cost in advance or you may find yourself landed with an unexpectedly large bill. This is a bit of a scam in the San Marco tourist restaurants where a big show is made of a whole fish cooked in salt which you discover later has a hefty price tag.

Pizza in Venice Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Pizza in Venice

Other things to check are the cover charge which may add a few euros per person and a service charge which may be added on to the bill. Of course if you’d like to have that coffee at Florian in St Mark’s Square while listening to the musicians, you should do so knowing that it has a tourist price tag (the prices are clearly shown on the menu outside). Venice is a great place to try local Italian wines by the glass in a side-street wine bar and in the early evening you can join the locals in a bright orange Aperol Spritz, a Bellini or a glass of Prosecco.

Try the cicchetti or bar snacks in Venice Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Try the cicchetti or bar snacks in Venice

Eat standing up

A custom that takes us Brits by surprise, but is quite the done thing, is to stand up or perch on a bar stool while having a drink and a snack with friends. Don’t be put off in the wine bars if there are only a few small tables and you have to rest your drink on a shelf along the wall. This is where you can order cicchetti, or small bar snacks which range from miniature sandwiches to dishes of salad and cold seafood. The ideas is to order a glass of wine and point at whatever dish looks tempting, then stay for another or move on to the next bar.

Artizan gelato in Venice Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Artizan gelato in Venice

The stand up principle also applies to gelateria. Look for those that are artizan, which indicates the gelato is made on the premises, where you will often find a few small tables or stool to sit inside. The same stand-up approach can also apply at the Pasticceria where you can grab a coffee at the bar with a sweet pastry or cake. Generally eating or drinking standing up means that the price is cheaper since table service is not required.

Eat Venice food app

Before I visited Venice I downloaded the Eat Venice app onto my phone in the hope that I could find some more authentic places to eat. The app is by Elizabeth Minchelli whose blog about Italian food is also a great source of information about eating in Venice. I loved reading about all the great places to eat on this app but found that once we were there we invariably couldn’t find them or were too hungry to hunt around.

It’s certainly worth using the app to find out good food places in your neighbourhood, but don’t get too worried if you don’t find them, it’s better to use your eyes to judge whether a place looks authentic. If it’s busy, packed, full of Italians chatting with their friends, then it’s worth waiting for a table.

Rialto market in venice Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

The Rialto market in venice

Self catering in Venice

While there are plenty of apartments in Venice and indeed we stayed in one of them, although it seems to be a bit sad to always be eating in when you are in the midst of a living postcard. There are a few supermarkets in Venice but not really the convenience stores that you find in other cities. The culture is to eat out in a bar or restaurant and picnics are discouraged, in fact there seems to be a rule that they are not allowed. Still an apartment does mean you have the flexibility to make yourself the breakfast or lunch that you want, while perhaps eating out in the evening.

Food Tours in Venice

Another great way to get the feel of the local food culture is to take a food tour like the Rialto Market and Cicchetti wine bar tour with Walks of Italy. This tour takes you around the Rialto fish market and into the artizan food shops with a stop at three different local bars to taste the cicchetti as well as restaurant recommendations from the local guide. I wish that we had been able to take this tour as I feel sure that our food experience in Venice would have been improved had we been armed with some insider knowledge.

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Read about how to eat well in Venice

Some more Venice recommendations

The Go with Oh apartment we stayed in was one that I won through Murissa’s blog at The Wanderful Traveller in the Passports with Purpose fundraiser. Murissa knows Venice well and kindly made me some recommendations of where to eat in Venice;

Hilton Molino Stucky Venice
If you don’t mind your kids drinking a bit of prossecco and toasting to what an amazing city you’ve all traveled to then head up to the top of this hotel. There is a bar that has a picturesque pool and overlooks the entire city of Venice. Take the Zattere water bus stop over to Stucky.

Osteria Enoteca ai Artisti
You’ll find this recommendation in your Eat Venice app. Delicious and not too pricey food in a quaint location not far from where we stayed. http://www.enotecaartisti.com

Al Mercà (Rialto market area)
One of my favourite cicchetti bars – cheap and amazing sandwiches (the prosciutto is my favourite!), delicious prossecco, and a view of the hustle of the market/canal. Standing room only.

All’Arco (Rialto market area)
Family run cicchetti bar where you can eat local foods for very cheap. Cicchetti are Venetian snacks for cheap and have been served for hundreds of years. I personally love the deep fried mozzarella with fresh sardines but stuffed zucchinni flowers are divine as well. Good for lunch – mostly standing room only when you visit cicchetti bars.

Do Spade (Rialto Market area)
Where Casanova frequented in the mid 1700s. Delicious cicchetti, wine and beer. Locals and tourists alike. Just go up to the counter order and find a spot. Not far from the Rialto Bridge/Market.

Book a tour of Venice

We highly recommend Walks of Italy who offer a number of different tours in  Venice and other parts of Italy, which are ideal if you are only visiting for a short time. You’ll have an expert local guide to show you around and can often skip the queues at key sites. We took the 2 hour Venice Boat Tour which took us down the Grand Canal and many of the smaller canals with views of the key sites of Venice including a visit to the island of San Giorgio Maggiore where we climbed the bell tower with amazing views of Venice. Read my review of the Walks of Italy Boat Tour here.

Where to stay in Venice

For our 3 day stay in Venice I rented an apartment with Go with Oh and was able to use the €250 voucher that I won with Passports with Purpose blogger fundraiser. We chose this apartment in the San Marco district since it was so well located for all the main sites.

Thanks to Murissa from The Wonderful Traveller who hosted this prize contributed by Go with Oh and and for her tips on what to see in Venice. Passports with Purpose is a really worthwhile organisation which supports a different cause each year and you can win some really fabulous prizes so it’s definitely participating.

This article is originally published at Heatheronhertravels.com – Read the original article here

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Climbing monkeys and flying foxes – in Wilder Kaiser, Austria

August 15, 2015 by  
Filed under Austria, Cycling, featured, Leisure, Nature, Walking

“We all have a little monkey in us from way back”, jokes Hervé Chayrou, the owner and our instructor at Hornpark, a treetop adventure playground with 8 aerial courses and 14 zip wires over a lake. We’re gathered at a social get together on the first evening of Alpine Sports Week in the Wilder Kaiser valley of Austria, hearing about all the outdoor activities on offer including high wire climbing, mountain-biking and canyoning.

Climbing at Horn Park in Wilder Kaiser, Austria

Heather and Michael from Bemused Backpacker – Climbing at Horn Park in Wilder Kaiser, Austria

But I’m not quite sure whether I will re-discover my “Little Monkey” on the Hornpark high wire course. I’ve heard of similar treetop courses like Go Ape in the UK where my kids might go for an adventurous birthday party. Normally my happy place is an Alpine hiking trail, preferably with blue skies and brilliant sunshine and a mountain hut where I can order a cold beer and admire the view. I may have walked the Tour de Mont Blanc and tried a Via Ferrata, but the high wire course is definitely stretching my climbing abilities.

I hope you enjoy my video below about the Alpine Sports in Wilder Kaiser, Austria

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Heather fitted with climbing harness at Hornpark, Wilder Kaiser Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Heather fitted with climbing harness at Hornpark, Wilder Kaiser

In the cosy hut we are fitted out with helmets and climbing harnesses and the instructor checks that they are tightly fitted. Not the most flattering or comfortable of rigouts with the loops tight around your thighs and the waistband cutting in above your hips.

Next comes the most important part – the safety training. Since we are going to be high up in the treetops performing daring climbing manoevres, it’s good to know that the cables, ropes and carabiners are there to save you if you fall. But at the end of the day it’s also down to how well you follow the safety procedures and golden rules of climbing.

Climbing at Horn Park in Wilder Kaiser, Austria

Climbing at Horn Park in Wilder Kaiser, Austria

Rule number 1 – there are always 2 separate carabiners (metal clips) and they clip to the safety wire in opposite directions so you can never accidentally unclip them both at once.

Rule number 2 – as you clip and unclip the carabiner, you always keep one hand on the safety wire.

Rule number 3 – the carabiners are colour coded red-to-red and green-to-green and match the place where you clip them, either onto a safety wire or onto the metal slider you use when on the flying fox.

With these and a few other golden safety rules swimming around my head we practice on the ground with the instructor to get the hang of what we will soon be trying high in the treetops.

Climbing at Horn Park in Wilder Kaiser, Austria

Climbing at Horn Park in Wilder Kaiser, Austria

We move on to the beginner course which doesn’t seem too tough. The gaps from tree to tree are quite short and the platforms not far off the ground. There are a few wobbly moments, but confidence is high. Then I realise that this course is just so the instructors can check we are doing it correctly. Just a warmup really!

Climbing at Horn Park in Wilder Kaiser, Austria

Climbing at Horn Park in Wilder Kaiser, Austria

Moving onto the green beginner level rope course feels a bit different. Suddenly I have to reach a little further, bend and twist my knees awkwardly and use tummy muscles I didn’t know I had. Just to get up to the first platform I have to scale a climbing wall which only reveals how my weak my arm muscles really are.

Crossing the tightrope wires isn’t too stressful so long as I focus on every step. In between I inch carefully around the small wooden platfrorm, carefully clipping and unclipping the carabiners as I’ve been taught. The most tricky bit is crossing the wooden poles that swing from chains. My knees shake as I attempt to step from one unstable pole to the next. Where I have two choices, I decide against the skateboard which zips across the gap and step gingerly across some wooden blocks instead.

Climbing at Horn Park in Wilder Kaiser, Austria

Climbing at Horn Park in Wilder Kaiser, Austria

After the first green course I move onto the intermediate blue course and this time it all feels a lot more dodgy. The climbing wall at the beginning reminds me that I should really get back to the gym and build up my upper body strength which is frankly pathetic. I try the zipwire and manage to end up lower than the platform with my legs waving like a spider. After a few minutes dangling there, I in-elegantly maneouvre my legs up onto the platform and haul myself up like a sack of potatoes.

Once back on the ground I watch another member of the group who has dared to try the much harder red course. I can barely watch as he eventually makes it across the wooden poles swinging in a zig zag pattern and finally gets down sweating with fear and exertion.

Zip wire at Horn Park, Wilder Kaiser

Zip wire at Horn Park, Wilder Kaiser

The best bit of the day is at the end when we try the longer ‘flying fox’ zip-wires that criss-cross the lake, having built up our confidence and trust in the equipment. Earlier I watched, as one girl dangled just short of the platform and had to be winched down by an instructor. Thankfully I fly across the lake and just make it onto the wooden platform although there is still a bit of hauling up to be done on the rope. I find that each zipwire is actually a series of zipwires which takes you in stages, gradually down to ground level.

Zip wire at Horn Park, Wilder Kaiser

Zip wire at Horn Park, Wilder Kaiser

The final zip-wire starts high just by the cable car station and ends in the treetops the other side. By now I feel like an old hand – this could get addictive! I’m tempted to have just one more go on the zip wire but realise I should know my limits.

How do I sum up the day on the high wire? Scary but exhilarating and if here’s a little monkey in all of us, I think I found mine today!

Read about my day of Mountain-biking in Wilder Kaiser

Read more articles about Alpine Sports in Wilder Kaiser

Bemused Backpacker – Experiencing the Wilder Kaiser Alpine Sports Week in Austria
Scarlett London – Wilder Kaiser region in Austria
Daniellicacy – Wilder Kaiser, Austria
Emtalks – Exploring Austria – the Wilder Kaiser Region, Tirol
Borders of Adventure – Climbing in Austria – alternative views in Tirol of the Kitzbuheler Alps

Want to try Alpine Sports Week yourself?

Heather tried out her outdoor activities as part of Alpine Sports Week in Wilder Kaiser. This special week long event allows you to try out 6 different mountain sports over 6 days under the guidance of expert instructors at a special price of €99 (normally €358). In addition to the high rope course and mountain-biking that Heather tried you can go canyoning, trail running and do a Via Ferrata. Sign up here for more information.

All of these activities are also available throughout the summer to try as you like. In addition the region is a paradise for hikers with many day walks as well as multi-day hut-to-hut walks of 3 to 5 days in length.

You can spend a day on the high wire like the one Heather tried at Hornpark in St Johann in Tirol, Austria for €29 per day (adults) including lift pass and all equipment and safety instruction – check their website and Facebook page.

For more information on things to do in Wilder Kaiser visit the Wilder Kaiser tourism website and their social media channels on their BlogTwitter | Facebook | Instagram | Google+. More information about things to do in the Tirol region of Austria on the Tirol tourism website.

How to get to Wilder Kaiser

Heather flew from Bristol to Munich with BMI Regional who fly 12 times each week on this route, so you often have a choice of 2 flights per day. The ticket includes 20kg checked baggage and full at-seat in-flight bar and snack service at no extra charge.

Transfers from Munich to Wilder Kaiser take around 1.5 hours and can be arranged through Four Seasons Travel who have a desk at the airport. Alternatively Innsbruck airport is around 1 hour drive from Wilder Kaiser.

Hotel Sonnenhof

Where to stay in Wilder Kaiser

Heather stayed at the comfortable, family run Vitel and Panorama Hotel Sonnenhof in Going. This four star hotel is furnished traditionally with plenty of Tyrolean wood and has a spa and indoor swimming pool. I enjoyed the hearty breakfast spread with a full selection of muesli, fruit, nutty German breads and freshly cooked omlettes as well as fresh juices, honeycomb and anything else you would wish for. Check prices and book your stay here.

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Read about climbing at Hornpark in Wilder Kaiser, Austria

Thanks to Wilder Kaiser Tourist Board who hosted Heather’s stay and provided the experiences mentioned and to BMI regional who provided Heather’s flight to Munich.

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