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Sir Francis Drake and the Rembrandt Selfie – at Buckland Abbey in Devon

Sir Francis Drake was born on a farm just a few miles from Buckland Abbey in Devon, a National Trust property that we visited while staying for the weekend at the Moorland Garden Hotel. From modest beginnings, ‘El Draco’ had grown up to become a buccaneer (that’s a polite word for pirate), great Elizabethan naval commander and scourge of the Spanish Empire in Central America where he attacked their ships and stole their gold at every opportunity.

Sir Francis Drake & the Rembrandt Selfie at Buckland Abbey Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Sir Francis Drake & the Rembrandt Selfie at Buckland Abbey

Since Queen Elizabeth I was one of his backers, she was thrilled when Drake returned to England in 1580 with his ship, the Golden Hind, laden with Spanish treasure, of which she would take the lion’s share. Drake was knighted as a reward and bought Buckland Abbey with just a small part of his bounty, adopting as his motto ‘Sic Parvis Magna’ – from small beginnings come great things.

Figures of Sir Francis Drake and Queen Elizabeth I at Buckland Abbey Photo: Heatheronhertravels

Figures of Sir Francis Drake and Queen Elizabeth I at Buckland Abbey

Buckland Abbey’s more recent claim to fame is the Rembrandt self-portrait which came to the property in 2010 as a legacy. Until recently the painting was thought to be a portrait of the artist by one of his pupils or a copy of one of his originals. A visit by the Rembrandt expert, Professor Ernst van de Wetering, prompted a reconsideration of the painting and investigations started to see if it could be a genuine self-portrait.

The now confirmed Rembrandt ‘Selfie’ is housed in a ground floor exhibition room at the abbey, with fascinating information about all the detective work that went into establishing that it was the real thing. The portrait has an element of the dressing up box about it, with the artist in a flamboyant cap with ostrich feather, flowing velvet cape and gold chain, using the ‘Tronie’ style of Dutch painting in which people were portrayed as historic or mythological characters.

The Rembrandt self-portrait at Buckland Abbey in Devon Photo: Heatheronhertravels

The Rembrandt self-portrait at Buckland Abbey in Devon

We watched a video explaining the reasons that the portrait was agreed by art experts to be genuine, such as the fact that the signature had been made when the rest of the paint was still wet, rather than added afterwards. It also appears to have been written rather carelessly, with the artist running out of space so that he left off the D in his name, something you might not dare do if you were a forger.

Xrays and infra-red photography showed how the shape of the figure was blocked out on the canvas, which was a typical technique Rembrandt used and an analysis of the pigments showed they were consistent for the period.

After painstaking research, analysis and cleaning, the self-portrait was found to be genuine and now takes pride of pace in the centre of the exhibition room, where you can see the back with original labels and markings, as well as the front.

View from the Great Barn at Buckland Abbey Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

View from the Great Barn at Buckland Abbey

On arrival at Buckland Abbey we walked down into the Ox Yard, where old farm buildings now house craft workshops and a room where you can see a video about Sir Francis Drake. The shop and restaurant are in what was once the old monastic guest house.

Buckland Abbey was, as the name suggests, originally founded in 1273 as a monastery by Amicia, the Countess of Devon, in memory of her son who had been murdered.  She endowed the monastery and large estates in Devon to the Cistercian order who divided their time between spiritual devotions and agricultural labours, especially sheep farming.

The Great Barn, which sits right beside the main house, was built at this time and is one of the largest of the period with oak roof beams arching 60 feet above you as you enter. It was built to store the farm produce, its sheer size indicating the wealth and productivity of the abbey estates and is often used for workshops and events like carol singing at Christmas.

Since we were there in the late autumn, we found that apples from the estate were being pressed to make cider, the group of volunteers only taking up a small space of the huge barn.

Cider making in the Great Barn at Buckland Abbey, Devon Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Cider making in the Great Barn at Buckland Abbey, Devon

After King Henry VIII’s dissolution of the monasteries in 1539, the abbey buildings and estate were sold to Sir Richard Grenville whose heirs converted the monastic buildings including the church into a private home. Sir Francis Drake moved to Buckland in 1582, the same year he became Mayor of Plymouth aged 39, already famous for his 3 year circumnavigation of the world and his exploits in the New World.

Statue of Sir Francis Drake at Buckland Abbey in Devon Photo: Heatheronhertravels

Statue of Sir Francis Drake at Buckland Abbey in Devon

We enjoyed a look around the various galleries in the house where portraits and objects from the house’s history are on display. Pride of place in the Treasures Gallery on the first floor is taken by Drake’s Drum, which he took on his naval voyages and is said to sound whenever England is in danger. To the side of this main display room was the oak panelled Drake’s Chamber, filled with oak furniture and portraits of the period, just as it might have looked in Drake’s day.

Drake's Drum at Buckland Abbey, Devon Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Drake’s Drum at Buckland Abbey, Devon

Along the corridor we moved on 200 years as we walked into the Georgian Dining Room, while up the stairs to the top floor was the Long Gallery, dominated by a huge statue of Sir Francis Drake. This long, open space was used in Tudor times for the inhabitants to get some indoor exercise and we found information about life on board the ships that Drake might have sailed and the lives of the Cistercian monks.

Buckland Abbey in Devon Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Buckland Abbey in Devon

Back on the ground floor were the Tudor kitchens, laid out with 18th century cooking utensils and foods as if preparing for the dinner party upstairs. The final part of the tour was through the Great Hall, created in 1576 by Sir Richard Grenville when he converted the monastery into a house. Apparently the nave of the old church where the monks were buried sits under the pink and white tiled floor of the Great Hall.

Gardens at Buckland Abbey in Devon Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Gardens at Buckland Abbey in Devon

Our tour finished, we came out of the house and back into the beautiful formal gardens, inspired by Tudor knot hedges filled with roses and a small orchard of apple trees. If we’d had more time, we could also have taken a walk around the Buckland Abbey estate through the great deer park and woodland where wild garlic and bluebells bloom in the spring.

If you are on the western edge of Dartmoor visiting Tavistock or Plymouth, do stop in to Buckland Abbey for a big slice of Devon’s history and to find more about Sir Francis Drake and the Rembrandt selfie.

If you go: Buckland Abbey, Yelverton, Devon, PL20 6EY, Tel: 01822 853607
Closed in January, re-opens 14 February 2015. Open daily 11-4 in winter, 10:30-5:30 in spring/summer. Admission Adult £11, Child £5.50. (check website for more details) Follow on Social Media: Twitter @BucklandAbbeyNT | Facebook | Instagram |Thanks to the National Trust who gave Heather and Guy complimentary admission to Buckland Abbey.

Where to stay:

Moorland Garden HotelHeather and Guy stayed at Moorland Garden Hotel which is close by at Yelverton – read my review here. The hotel is an ideal base for those wanting to explore the area for walking on Dartmoor or to visit the Ocean City of Plymouth. The rooms are all decorated in colourful style using a garden and moorland theme and the award winning Wildflower restaurant is highly recommend for lunch, dinner or cream teas overlooking the lawns.

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10 Comments

  • Reply
    Lauren Meshkin @BonVoyageLauren
    January 11, 2015 at 3:54 am

    Wow! It was fascinating to read about all the work that went into proving the portrait was genuine. Also, those gardens are so lovely. I’d love to visit Buckland Abbey, thanks for sharing!

    Happy travels 🙂

    • Reply
      Heather Cowper
      January 12, 2015 at 7:47 am

      @Lauren it was a beautiful place to visit – Id like to visit those gardens in the summer too

  • Reply
    Barbara Weibel
    January 11, 2015 at 6:18 am

    I love the idea of this painting being an earlier version of today’s selfie!

    • Reply
      Heather Cowper
      January 12, 2015 at 7:45 am

      @Barbara yes they have been encouraging visitors to take their own selfies and post them online

  • Reply
    Uptourist
    January 12, 2015 at 4:51 am

    That place is simply beautiful. The building reminds me so much of royalty that it takes me back in time.

    • Reply
      Heather Cowper
      January 12, 2015 at 7:44 am

      @Uptourist you can definitely feel the history of the place.

  • Reply
    jaklien
    January 12, 2015 at 11:47 am

    This looks like a good spot for a little staycation.
    jaklien´s last blog post ..Breakfast Spots in Montreal

    • Reply
      Heather Cowper
      January 12, 2015 at 1:11 pm

      @Jaklien yes, devon is only a couple of hours from me and I’ll be heading back there in a couple of weeks.

  • Reply
    Robert
    January 19, 2015 at 2:45 am

    A Rembrandt Selfie, how cool is that. We made it to London on our British Isles cruise last year but didn’t make it too the countryside. This would be a good place to include in our next trip.

  • Reply
    Stacy
    February 10, 2015 at 12:19 pm

    Lovely place and nice description from you. Thanks for sharing.

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