Sea views and springtime in St Mawes – our weekend in Cornwall

There’s something magical about waking up in Cornwall in springtime with a view of the Fal estuary from your bedroom window. “Tide’s in” says Guy as we open the curtains and lie in bed watching a tanker chug past St Anthony’s lighthouse and the St Mawes ferry heading for Falmouth.

Sea Views and springtime in St Mawes, Cornwall

From our luxury holiday house, the aptly named Dreamcatchers booked through St Mawes Retreats, we have a view of the sea over the slate rooftops of the cottages, where people are waking up this fine morning. I can walk out from the living room, through the French windows, onto the deck with a cup of coffee in hand and bask in the spring sunshine, just drinking in the view.

In spring the sea has a wild and mesmerising charm, as little ruffles of white speed across the grey-blue water and subside again. I’ve stayed here before of course, at Stargazers, another St Mawes Retreats property and have been hearing the call of the sea and Cornwall ever since – read about our last visit here.

I hope you enjoy the video below from our spring weekend break at Dreamcatchers in Cornwall with St Mawes Retreats

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Dreamcatchers luxury holiday house with St Mawes Retreats Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Dreamcatchers luxury holiday house with St Mawes Retreats

Dreamcatchers is one of five luxurious holiday houses in the St Mawes Retreats portfolio, four of which are in St Mawes itself, the fifth in nearby Fowey and all have spectacular views of the sea. The house is beautifully furnished with oversized Designers Guild florals, white walls and a sprinkling of sparkle and glamour. It’s light and airy yet warm and cosy and with those fabulous sea views, you really want to just curl up on the sofa or sit on the deck with a glass of wine and never leave. The houses are perfect for groups of friends like us who want to get away from our city lives for a relaxing short break by the sea.

Dreamcatchers luxury holiday house in St Mawes, Corwall through St Mawes Retreats  Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Dreamcatchers luxury holiday house in St Mawes, Corwall through St Mawes Retreats

Luxury and the Wow! factor

While we’re staying at Dreamcatchers for the weekend I reflect on how ‘luxury’ means different things to different people. For the girls in our party it’s the fabulous decor, the huge baths and walk-in showers within the bedrooms that have the Wow! factor. “I want to go back home and paint everything white!” declares my sister-in-law Clare as she dreams of recreating that ‘by the sea’ feeling. “I love all the colour” sighs my friend Penny and reminisces about wet camping weekends in Cornwall of the past that didn’t quite have the Dreamcatchers magic.

Dreamcatchers luxury holiday house in St Mawes, Corwall through St Mawes Retreats Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

The bedrooms at Dreamcatchers luxury holiday house in St Mawes, Corwall through St Mawes Retreats

As for the men, the house brings out the cave man spirit as Guy’s eyes light up at the wood burning stove, with logs set by ready for him to stoke it up. Meanwhile, my brother-in-law Andrew spots the enormous gas fired BBQ on the deck, and immediately starts planning our dinner around it, since he’s been known to cook the Christmas turkey on the BBQ before. My teenage son and friends fiddle with the sound system that defeats the rest of us and are duly impressed by the flat screen TVs in every room – there’s even the one above the bath in their own en suite bathroom.

Dreamcatchers luxury holiday house in St Mawes, Corwall through St Mawes Retreats Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

The living rooms at Dreamcatchers luxury holiday house in St Mawes, Corwall through St Mawes Retreats

Dreamcatchers is beautifully liveable as a holiday house to relax with friends and family. The house seems to swallow us all effortlessly, with a second sitting room that the teenagers can make their den.  We lounge around on the squashy leather sofas, play cards, drink wine, admire the twinkly lights in the oak staircase, gaze out to sea and generally catch up on everyone’s news.

When it comes to mealtimes, the kitchen has so many cupboards that we spend ages opening them all just to find a coffee cup or a plate. With two large fridges, a wine chiller, a super duper coffee machine to bring out your inner barista and pretty mother-of-pearl mosaic tiles this kitchen is made for a party.

St Mawes in Cornwall staying with St Mawes Retreats Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

St Mawes in Cornwall staying with St Mawes Retreats

Along the seafront

On Saturday morning, we wander down to the harbour at St Mawes that we had surveyed from the deck of Dreamcatchers. The narrow seafront road is lined with whitewashed cottages with blue shutters and daffodil window boxes and further on towards the Tresanton Hotel we pass pretty pastel villas with fanciful sea-faring names. I can’t resist stopping in the Waterside Gallery, filled with lovely glassware, paintings and sculptures from Cornish artists where I give the wooden seagull sculpture that hangs from the ceiling a pull to make it sway hypnotically up and down.

St Mawes harbour in Cornwall staying with St Mawes Retreats Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

St Mawes harbour in Cornwall

St Mawes Harbour

Around the harbour at St Mawes there are plenty of pubs, cafes and gift shops, although in March everywhere is quiet since the main holiday season starts at Easter. I imagine that in August the village is packed out but I quite like visiting places like this out of season before the crowds arrive. A racing gig comes onto the beach since the all-female crew have been out training and we watch them heave the boat out of the water.

In the past these pilot gigs were working boats, used to take a pilot out to a ship coming into the estuary and the race was to see who could get to the ship first to win the business. Now the pilot gigs are raced for sport along the Cornish coast and you’ll spot the Rosaland Gig club in the centre of St Mawes by the vintage petrol pumps standing outside.

By the harbour in St Mawes in Cornwall staying with St Mawes Retreats Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

By the harbour in St Mawes in Cornwall

The St Mawes Ferry

Last time we visited St Mawes, I’d seen the blue ferry passing by, but there were so many other places to explore that we didn’t have time to try it out. The ferry has the appearance of an old fashioned wooden toy boat, only life size, and it runs every day of the year but Christmas (more information here). On boarding the ferry we sat in the sunshine on the open top deck, enjoying the wind on our face and the fantastic views of St Mawes Castle and the boats in the estuary as we made the 15 minute journey across to Falmouth.

St Mawes ferry to Falmouth Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Taking the St Mawes ferry to Falmouth

Reaching Falmouth Harbour

Falmouth is a town that faces a deep natural harbour with a history that has for centuries been linked to the sea. As we approached on the St Mawes Ferry, we could see the marina with industrial cranes where they build Pendennis superyachts and the castle on the headland that mirrors the one on the other side at St Mawes to protect the estuary. The tide was out with seagulls making a constant shriek and shrill as they picked over the seaweed while the water lapped against the quayside.

Falmouth which we visited on the ferry from St Mawes when staying with St Mawes Retreats Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Falmouth which we visited on the ferry from St Mawes

From the ferry pier we turned left and passed a range of unremarkable high street shops, but further on these gave way to smaller art galleries and cafes, with plenty of places to buy your Cornish pasty or fish and chips. We thought Falmouth seemed like a great place to live, a proper town with plenty of charm without being too touristy or bijoux. We wandered past the Georgian shop buildings painted in shades of pale grey, lemon and sky blue with bunting strung between them fluttering  jauntily in the wind. From the main street we could follow small alleyways, leading up the hill or down to the sea, giving a tantalising glimpse of blue between the buildings.

Falmouth which we visited on the ferry from St Mawes when staying with St Mawes Retreats Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Down the alleyways of Falmouth with a glimpse of the sea

A Cornish pasty and a pint

This being the heartland of the Cornish pasty we were planning to try one for lunch, preferrably combined with a jug of Cornish Ale and a view of the sea. Down on Custom House Quay we spotted a sign in the pasty shop that said we could eat them in the pub opposite called “The Front bar on the quay” and entered the old style pub with a bar lined with Cornish ales and ciders that made Guy’s eyes light up. To get the view of the sea we had to sit on a bench outside, with a fine harbour view, only slightly marred by the constant stream of cars coming down the lane to park.

Falmouth which we visited on the ferry from St Mawes when staying with St Mawes Retreats Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Lunch with a pint of Cornish ale and a harbour view in Falmouth

Having eaten our pasties, I went to explore the interesting Watermen’s Gallery with my sister-in-law, Clare and got chatting to the artist in residence, Sophi Beharrell who was working on a half finished painting of a cliff scene in Cornwall. There were many lovely Cornish seascapes on the wall, and other artistic gifts, but we made do with buying a few greeting cards of the paintings.

Falmouth which we visited on the ferry from St Mawes when staying with St Mawes Retreats Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Falmouth which we visited on the ferry from St Mawes when staying with St Mawes Retreats

St Mawes Castle

Returning to St Mawes on the ferry, we decide to extend our walk to St Mawes Castle, following the lane of well kept Edwardian villas, pastel pink or bright white with freshly painted blue windows. It’s rather sad that almost all seemed to be holiday homes, with not a light on and no-one at home. I wondered what it’s like to be a local around here, seeing these houses go empty for much of the year.

St Mawes Castle, Cornwall staying with St Mawes Retreats Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

St Mawes Castle, Cornwall staying with St Mawes Retreats

Further on, we reached St Mawes Castle, a petite fortress built by Henry VIII to guard the strategic Fal estuary from invasion, matched by its twin of Pendennis castle on the other side above Falmouth. The castle is now run by English Heritage, although it was just closing as we arrived, so we didn’t go in but continued up the muddly lane with the sea on our left. Here we passed more smart houses, with gardens full of rosemary, hydrangeas and camelias that would withstand the sea air, but again found all the houses in darkness. The path would have taken us to St Just in Rosaland but the fields were muddy and dusk was falling so we returned to Dreamcatchers for the scones and clotted cream tea that had been left for us by St Mawes Retreats.

Cream tea – Jam first or cream first?

If you ever meet a Cornishman be aware that the innocent cream tea has become a hot topic over how it should best be eaten. In Devon it seems that the scone is always spread with cream first then the jam on top while in Cornwall it’s jam first and cream on the top and there’s heated debate over which way is best. I remained impartial, tried both and found it delicious either way.

Cream ea at St Mawes Retreats, Cornwall Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Cream ea at St Mawes Retreats, Cornwall

To the Lighthouse

On Sunday the blue skies and spring sunshine had turned to grey cloud and light drizzle but we pressed on with our visit to St Anthony’s Lighthouse which I’d visited on previous trips to St Mawes. In summer you can get a 10 minute ferry ride straight across from St Mawes, but we had to drive the 20 minutes around the headland and parked in the National Trust carpark at the end of the road.

St Anthony's Head lighthouse in Cornwall Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

St Anthony’s Head lighthouse in Cornwall

St Anthony Head is the site of many Second World War fortifications, concrete bunkers and observation posts with a fine view over the estuary. We walked down through the sheltered pines to the path to St Anthony’s lighthouse, which featured as the lighthouse in the TV puppet show, Fraggle Rock. You can’t get close up to the lighthouse which is still in use although there is a holiday cottage there that can be rented. We retraced our steps and walked along the sheltered path to the beach of Great Molunan, walking past the first cove and scrambling down to the next with the help of a rope. The tide was out with only us and a couple of kayakers on the beach and a view back to St Anthony’s lighthouse.

Walk to the beach near St Anthony's Head Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Walk to the beach near St Anthony’s Head

After our blustery walk we drove back to St Mawes, diverting for lunch at Portscatho at the Plume of Feathers pub in the heart of the village.We installed ourself in a cosy side room and ordered some hearty pub fare – both the fish and chips and the roast Sunday lunch were excellent and ticked all the boxes for a proper Cornish lunch.

Fish and Chips at the Plume of Feathers in Portscatho, Cornwall Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Fish and Chips at the Plume of Feathers in Portscatho, Cornwall

Back at Dreamcatchers it was time to pack our bags again and take a  final look out at the window at those sea views, wishing we could stay a few more days. There’s something therapeutic about being within sight of the sea, the constant motion of the waves breaking on the rocks, the wind blowing away the mental cobwebs, and the rhythm of life on the water with the boats passing by. Our life in Bristol required us back but I know that it’s won’t be long before I feel the call of Cornwall, St Mawes and the sea again.

More information for your short break with St Mawes Retreats

St Mawes Retreats offers luxury holiday accommodation in Cornwall, with 4 properties in St Mawes and 1 in Fowey, sleeping between 4 and 12 guests. The larger houses are ideal for groups of family and friends to share and the St Mawes properties are all close to each other so are ideal for extended family stays and celebration events. The houses are available for short breaks and weekend stays in spring and autumn at surprisingly affordable rates, with special low occupancy rates for smaller groups in the winter, and the cost per person is well below that of a similar standard boutique hotel.

Dreamcatchers where we stayed has 5 en suite bedrooms, 2 sitting rooms, breathtaking sea views from the living rooms and master bedrooms, a south facing garden and is a short walk from St Mawes village on the beautiful Rosalind Peninsula. Dreamcatchers can be booked for short breaks from £952 in spring and autumn with low occupancy discounts in winter.

To book visit the St Mawes Retreats website or ring owner Amanda Selby on 0800 0886622 to discuss your requirements, as there are many concierge services available such as a private chef, beauty treatments, shopping services, childcare and help with organising your celebration event. For news and special offers follow St Mawes Retreats on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Pinterest |

Thanks to St Mawes Retreats for hosting Heather and friends for their weekend stay in Dreamcatchers.

More Cornish adventures

Is this the perfect sea view? Our luxury weekend at St Mawes in Cornwall
Cliff walks and country houses in Cornwall
Just me and the boys down on the farm in Cornwall

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Read about our luxury weekend break by the sea at St Mawes in Cornwall

This article is originally published at Heatheronhertravels.com – Read the original article here

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Six of the best coffees around the world

Are you a coffee lover like me? It’s the aroma of freshly ground coffee beans that hits your nose first and then you take a sip of hot, sweet coffee. Ahhh, the day starts to feel better already. But perhaps for you it’s a tiny cup of strong, black expresso, ending the meal perfectly like a full stop at the end of a sentence. Or a frothy cappuccino to eat with a sweet pastry for breakfast like they do in Spain.

6 of the best coffees around the world

However you like it, a great cup of coffee is full of ritual as you watch a skilled barista operate those shiny machines that woosh and hiss, or the buzzy atmosphere of your favourite coffee shop where you meet your friends for a late morning weekend brunch or an afternoon coffee and cake.

Now I’m dreaming about all the coffees I’ve enjoyed on my travels, each coffee experience giving me a doorway into the culture of the place I visited. For more coffee inspiration, take a look at this Coffee infographic that will take you around the world in 31 coffees, but in the meantime let me share with you some of my favourite coffees around the world.

1. Copenhagen – the best coffee in the world?

If ever there was a place where they know how to elevate coffee to an art form it is Copenhagen and Coffee Collective sits among the best of the best.

Coffee Collective in Copenhagen Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Coffee Collective in Copenhagen

I visited their original coffee shop in Nørrebro a few years ago, a tiny place with just a few wooden tables outside and a stool inside to perch while your coffee is being expertly made. Their coffee beans are sold all around Copenhagen and they operate on a Direct Trade model, working with farmers in Brazil, Guatamala, Kenya and Panama to pay the best prices for the best quality coffee. If you visit this place you’ll probably be buying your coffee to take away (perhaps picking up a pastry from the Claus Meyer bakery across the road) but if you want to sit and enjoy your coffee in a foodie atmosphere, head for their stand in the Torvehallerne food market halls.

Coffee Cooperative in Copenhagen Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Coffee Cooperative in Copenhagen

Torvehallerne is one of my favourite places in Copenhagen, where you can get a fabulous but reasonably priced lunch or sip your coffee with a cake just like your Danish grandmother might have baked. The third branch of Coffee Collective is in Frederiksberg, where the beans are roasted and they do monthly tours and coffee tastings where you can learn how to make a perfect coffee. Definitely a place of pilgrimage for the coffee connoisseur.

Read More: Eat the Neighbourhood in Norrebro, Copenhagen

2. Coffee time is Fika time in Sweden

If you’ve visited Sweden I’m sure you’ll have come across the tradition of ‘fika’, or having a coffee break with friends. This is the occasion to settle down in a cosy cafe where the counters are laden with buns and pastries to relax over a good cup of coffee and a chat. When I visited Gothenburg I discovered that the picturesque old neighbourhood of Haga was the perfect fika spot, since its cobbled streets are lined with cafes, restaurants and artizan shops.

Buns at Cafe Kringlan in Haga, Gothenburg, Sweden Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Buns at Cafe Kringlan in Haga, Gothenburg, Sweden

Cafe Husaren on the corner of the main street of Hada Nygatan is reputed to be the original source of the enormous cinamon buns which are a speciality of Gothenburg, although we squeezed into the pretty, traditional Cafe Kringlan with the gold bagel hanging outside. The local’s choice for fika in Gothenburg seems to be Da Matteo and they have several shops including the largest in Magasingaten where they bake the bread and pastries on the premises, so you get the aroma of freshly baked bread thrown in with your coffee.

Read More: Favourite coffee spots in Gothenburg for your coffee fix

3. Salzburg – for coffee and cakes

Perhaps you’ve gathered by now that I have something of a sweet tooth, so heaven for me is a great cup of coffee served in the afternoon with a slice of the local cake. Of course Austria makes a speciality of this Kaffee und Kuchen ritual and where better than Salzburg, the glorious homeland of Mozart and the Sound of Music to enjoy it?

Steinterrasse in Salzburg Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Steinterrasse in Salzburg

When it comes to cake to accompany your afternoon coffee, you’ll likely be wavering between the Apfelstrudel (soft bites of apple wrapped in crisp layers of pastry) and the Sacher Torte (rich, dense chocolate cake laced with apricot jam). The traditional choice would probably be to head for Hotel Sacher which overlooks the river but we enjoyed our kaffee und kuchen on the rooftop terrace of the Hotel Stein with a fabulous view of the fortress, which is highly recommended in good weather. 

Read more: Bratwurst and Sacher Torte – or what we ate in Salzburg

4. A chilled frappe on the beach in Greece

Coffee can be a cool drink in more ways than one, as I discovered on my annual trips to Greece to visit my sister who lives on the Greek Island of Zakynthos. Traditionally the Greeks drink their coffee like the Turks, strong and sweet in a tiny cup together with those ultra-sweet pastries that drip with syrup. This is what you’d serve to friends who come visiting in the afternoon.

Frappuccino on Ionian beach, Zakynthos, Greece Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Frappuccino on Ionian beach, Zakynthos, Greece

But the trendy thing to drink in summer is a chilled Frappé – where an expresso is poured over ice with creamy milk to make a coffee that’s sipped through a straw from a long glass. When you’re lying on your sunbed or sitting in a trendy Greek beach bar, be sure to order a “Freddo” coffee, which comes in different Italian styles such as a Freddo cappuccino, Freddo Expresso or a Freddoccino (iced mocha coffee with chocolate). 

Read More: Sunday morning Greek coffee and Glika in Zakynthos

5. Ruddesheimer coffee in Germany – coffee with a creamy kick

If you fancy your coffee with something a little stronger, we found the perfect alternative coffee on our Rhine River Cruise stop at the pretty town of Rudesheim. Wandering down the cobbled street of the Drosselgasse with its wine shops and taverns we stopped at Rudesheimer Schloss to try the local speciality of Rudesheimer coffee.

Rudesheimer coffee Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Rudesheimer coffee

This coffee spiked with brandy is the German equivalent of Irish Coffee and started in the 1920s when the Alspach brandy company invented a brandy chocolate so that ladies could enjoy a secret tipple, at a time when it was considered unseemly for women to drink in public. One good thing lead to another and in the 1950s the Rudesheimer coffee was born, a warming mixture of sweet coffee with a good helping of Asbach brandy, topped with sweet, whipped vanilla cream and sprinkled with grated chocolate. These days the Rudesheimer coffee is served in all the local coffee shops and you can bring back small bottles of the Alspach brandy if you want to try it at home.

Read More: How to make a Rudesheimer coffee – video

6. A hot chocolate alternative to coffee in Gothenburg

If you’re not a coffee drinker, you’ll be pleased to know that in Gothenburg we found an excellent alternative at Cafe Kanold that specialises in velvety hot chocolate. Staying cosy from the chilly wind and weather, we sat on the cushioned banquette with pretty floral cushions and enjoyed a warming hot chocolate – served with chili flakes on top for an extra kick.

Cafe Kanold in Gothenburg, Sweden Photo: Heatheronhertravels.com

Cafe Kanold in Gothenburg, Sweden

While there is also a counter of hand-made Kanold chocolates in the cafe, you’ll want to visit the main Kanold chocolate shop close by on Södra Larmgatan at the end of Viktoriapassagen. It’s a cross between an old fashioned candy store and a boutique chocolatier where you can buy the Kanold speciality, a soft chocolate truffle centre topped with sea salt, which has now become known as the “Gothenburg Truffle”. Of course if you insist of coffee at Cafe Kanold, I’m sure they serve that too!

Read More: Chocolate with sea salt – a taste of West Sweden

Check out this Coffee Infographic

If you want to fuel your coffee fascination even more, take a look at this Coffee infographic from  Cheapflights that will take you around the world in 31 coffees. Here are a few cool coffee facts that I discovered;

  • In Italy you only drink milky coffee in the morning and NEVER after a meal – the cappuccino in the afternoon is only for tourists!
  • Breakfast in Spain normally consists of a cup of coffee with a sweet pastry or churros
  • In Senegal coffee is served with cloves and guinea pepper
  • In 2001 Brazil issued a coffee scented postage stamp
  • Seatle has 10 times more coffee store per head than the rest of the USA
Around the world in 31 Coffees Photo: Cheapflights.com

Around the world in 31 Coffees – infographic from Cheapflights

Now, please excuse me as I’m off to find the perfect coffee to have with my weekend brunch in Bristol

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6 of the best coffees around the world

This article is originally published at Heatheronhertravels.com – Read the original article here

This article is written in association with Cheapflights

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Plan your girlie trip to New York with Aer Lingus + win 2 flights to NYC!

March 12, 2015 by  
Filed under featured, USA, World

New York New York. It’s a city that has so far escaped me, but one that I now have in my sights since I can fly there so easily from the UK with Aer Lingus. Starting at my local airport of Bristol (or any one of 19 airports across the UK) I can fly via Dublin where I’ll be pre-cleared through customs and arrive at New York with more time to enjoy and less time to stand in queues. You’ll be even more interested when you hear about the competition they are running to win two return flights to New York plus £1000 spending money. If you’re tempted, read on to find out more.

aer lingus competiton

So here I am, thinking that it’s time to start planning that trip that I rather rashly promised my 19 year old daughter for her birthday some years ago (I didn’t say which birthday!) With no prior knowledge of what my daughter and I might enjoy in New York, I reached out to a few blogging friends for ideas and here’s what they came up with; (Thanks to Sherry, Barbara, Gary, Kenecia and Nancy for their tips)

Neighbourhoods to hang out in New York

I generally prefer to avoid the tourist traps in favour of neighbourhoods that have a more local feel, so Greenwich Village and SOHO sound perfect for wandering around the individual shops and cafes while Bleeker Street is the place for those cute vintage finds. I love the sound of Chelsea Market in the Meat Packing District, an enclosed food court with thirty five food vendors selling everything from artizan cheese to sushi. We might connect up with the Highline Park that runs past the market, an old railway line that’s been made into a green corridor and public garden high above the city along the West Side.

Interested? You can win those 2 free flights to NYC over here

High line park in New York Photo: Karlis Dambrans on Flickr

High line park in New York

Foodie stuff in New York

Whereas in London I might go for cocktails with my daughter, it’s a bit of a shock to find out that in New York she wouldn’t be able to drink legally until she’s 21. Never mind, perhaps we could try an elegant afternoon tea with blinis and caviar and a secret swig of vodka when no-one was looking, at the famed Russian Tea Room. I love to take a food tour since they always take you to those interesting little artizan producers or quirky cafes that you’d never find on your own, so we might try one of the Foods of NY tours. Finally, since we both have a sweet tooth we’d be sure to visit Serendipidy  for a light lunch finished off with their special frozen hot chocolate or stop to buy cupcakes from Baked by Melissa at their cute little store on 14th Street in Union square where I’m told they’ll be selling a shamrock green version for St Paddy’s day.

Russian tea room in New York

Russian tea room in New York

Quirky tours and getting local in New York

When I travel I love to connect with the locals so it would be fun to book a dinner through EatWith in a local’s apartment to get a feel for how people live, over a sociable dinner with other guests. We might book some time with a Big Apple Greeter and have a local  rather than a tour guide show us around their neighborhood or learn to use the subway – it’s a free service although donations are appreciated. And speaking of tours maybe it would be fun to do a Sex and the City tour to see where the girls hung out in the TV series or take an entertaining group tour of the Met or Natural History museum through Museum Hacks where crazy photos are positively encouraged.

Take an unconventional Museum Tour with Museum Hacks Photo: MuseumHacks.com

Take an unconventional Museum Tour with Museum Hacks

Finding my Irish Roots in New York

OK, I admit I don’t actually have any Irish roots that I know of, but since we’re flying with Aer Lingus, it’s fun to explore the Irish connection. We might start with a walking tour with Walks of New York of the Lower East Side where many of the immigrants to New York settled to find out about this part of New York’s history and stop at the Tenement Museum to see how working-class families lived crammed together.

With St Patrick’s day coming up it’s worth looking out for the big parade through Manhattan on Tuesday March 17th starting at 44th Street at 11am, if you happen to be in town – there’s a Time Out Guide here. Unfortunately we’ll have missed the Craic Fest for this March with Irish music, films and dancing for the kids but look out for it next year and the Irish Arts Centre hosts music and literary events throughout the year.

Feeling the Craic? Find out how you can win those 2 free flights to NYC

See how immigrant families lived at the Tenement Museum Photo: Tenement Museum

See how immigrant families lived at the Tenement Museum

 Flying to New York with Aer Lingus

So here’s what you need to know about flying to New York via Dublin with Aer Lingus;

  • Through Aer Lingus and their airline partners you can fly via Dublin from 19 local airports across the UK
  • From Dublin you have six USA destinations to choose from: Boston, Chicago, New York, Orlando, San Francisco and Washington DC
  • You’ll get US Preclearance in Dublin when travelling on to the USA, with less time waiting for clearance at the other end. 
  • You can enjoy plenty of food, shopping and free wifi as you transit through the state-of-the-art terminal in Dublin.
  • You get 23kg free check-in baggage allowance, with bags checked through to your final destination and pre-assigned seating on all flights.

So – in case you haven’t realised, Aer Lingus are also running a competition for the next 2 weeks to win 2 tickets to New York plus £1000 spending money – watch the video and enter the competition here

About the Aer Lingus Thru-the-Q competition

If you’d love to be in with a chance of winning 2 free flights to New York + £1000 spending money, this is how you enter. Go to the Aer Lingus Competition page here and vote for your favourite blogger to send to New York from a list of 19 great travel blogs and then Tweet about the competition.

The competition runs until Thursday 26th March and you can vote once in every 24 hour period with each vote giving you an additional chance to win. The winner will be chosen at random on Friday 27th March and the tickets must be used by the end of September 2015.
Hint: Flying via Dublin Airport will get you stateside fastest with no Queue in the USA

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New York Pinterest

Thanks to my blogging friends, Sherry from Ottsworld, Barbara from Hole in the donut, Gary from Tips for Travellers, Kenecia from Passport2Pretty and Nancy for their tips.

Photos: High Line Park by Karlis Dambrans, other photos from the places mentioned

This article was brought to you in partnership with Aer Lingus and I was compensated for all my New York tips and telling you about the competition to win 2 free flights to NYC. Good Luck!

This article is originally published at Heatheronhertravels.com – Read the original article here

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